Monthly Archives: January 2015

Comparing two smartphone-based infrared cameras

Figure 1
With the releases of two competitively priced IR cameras for smartphones, the year 2014 has become a milestone for IR imaging. Early in 2014, FLIR unveiled the $349 FLIR ONE, the first IR camera that can be attached to an iPhone. Months later, a startup company Seek Thermal released a $199 IR camera that has an even higher resolution and is attachable to most smartphones. In addition, another company Therm-App released an Android mobile thermal camera that specializes in long-range night vision and high-resolution thermography, priced at $1,600. The race is on... Into 2015, FLIR announced a new version of FLIR ONE that supports both Android and iOS and will probably be even more aggressively priced.

Figure 2
All these game changers can take impressive IR images just like taking conventional photos and record IR videos just like recording conventional videos, and then share them online through an app. The companies also provide a software developers kit (SDK) for a third party to create apps linked to their cameras. Excited by these new developments, researchers at several Swedish universities and I have embarked an international collaboration towards the vision that IR cameras will one day become as necessary as microscopes in science labs.

Figure3
To test these new IR cameras, I did an easy-to-do experiment (Figure 1) that shows a paradoxical warming effect on a piece of paper placed on top of a cup of (slightly cooler than) room-temperature water. This seemingly simple experiment actually leads to very deep science at the molecular level, as blogged before.

I took images using FLIR ONE (Figure 2) and SEEK (Figure 3), respectively. These images are shown to the right for comparison. As you can see, both cameras are sensitive enough to capture the small temperature rise caused by water absorption and condensation underside the paper.

The FLIR ONE has a nice feature that contextualizes the false-color IR image by overlaying it on top of the edges (where brightness changes sharply) of the true-color image taken at the same time by the conventional camera of the smartphone. With this feature, you can see the sharp edges of the paper in Figure 2.

Energy2D recommended in computational fluid dynamics textbook

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an important research method that uses numerical algorithms to solve and analyze problems that involve fluid flows. Computers are used to perform the calculations required to simulate the interaction of liquids and gases with surfaces defined by boundary conditions. Today, almost every branch of engineering rely on CFD simulations for conceptual design and product design.

A recent textbook "Computational Fluid Dynamics, Second Edition: A Practical Approach" by Profs. Jiyuan Tu, Guan Heng Yeoh, and Chaoqun Liu has recommended Energy2D as "Shareware CFD" for beginners. Here is a quote from their excellent book:
"Nevertheless, first-time CFD users may wish to search the Internet to gain immediate access to an interactive CFD code. (Users may be required to register in order to freely access the interactive CFD code.) The website is http://energy.concord.org/energy2d/index.html provides simple CFD flow problems for first time users to solve and allows colorful graphic representation of the computed results."

Happy New Year from Energy2D

In the year 2014, Energy2Dhas incorporated a radiation simulation engine and a particle simulation engine, expanding its modeling capacity and making it a truly multiphysics simulation package. To celebrate the New Year, I made some simulations that demonstrate these multiphysics features using objects shaped after the numbers of 2015.

These simulations feature the fluid dynamics engine, the heat conduction engine, the thermal radiation engine, and the particle dynamics engine. If you are curious enough, you can click this link to run the simulations.


These shapes were drawn using Energy2D's polygon and ring tools, which allow users to create a wide variety of arbitrary 2D shapes. Many users probably do not know how versatile the polygon tool actually is (the original triangle icon on the tool bar probably misleads some to think it is only good for drawing triangles -- so I changed it to look like a cross-section of an I-beam). The polygon tool allows one to easily draw a polygon with maximally 256 control points for adjusting its shape later. One can draw an approximate shape and then drag these control points to get it to the exact shape. To modify a shape even further, one can also insert a control point by double-clicking on an existing point. A new point will be added to the adjacent position, which you can then drag around. To delete a control point, just hold down the SHIFT key while double-clicking on it. In addition, a polygon can be rotated, twisted, compressed, or elongated using the corresponding fields in its property window (there is currently no graphical user interface for doing those things, however).

As for the New Year's resolutions, in 2015, the ring shape will be enhanced into a new tool called the shape subtractor, which allows users to subtract a shape from another to make a hollow one.

On the numerical simulation side, we will continue to improve the accuracy of the existing simulation engines by adding an explicit solver as an option for users to overcome some of the problems related to the implicit solvers.

On the multiphysics modeling side, we will try to support multiple fluids, which seems simple at first glance but has turned out to be a very difficult mathematical problem. With the capacity of multiple fluids, we will also be able to add an electromagnetism solver in order to model effects such as electrorheological fluids (fluids whose viscosity changes with respect to an applied electric field).

We wish all Energy2D users a very successful new year!