Author Archives: The Concord Consortium

Mechanical design and paper crafting combine in Paper Mechatronics

How can you make a cardboard owl that flaps its wings? Or a paper flower that blooms? With funding from the National Science Foundation, we are working with the University of Colorado’s Craft Technology Lab and the Children’s Creativity Museum in San Francisco to study and enhance the engineering education potential of Paper Mechatronics, an innovative educational technology genre that mixes creative papercrafts, mechanical design, and computational thinking. Soon, young learners will be designing real and fantastical paper inventions of their own imagination and animate them with mechanical motions.

The new two-year project builds off an earlier project by Principal Investigators Sherry Hsi and Michael Eisenberg, which prototyped several Paper Mechatronics design projects, organized activity formats, and piloted the various design elements with children and adults to determine which worked best to inspire learning and teach design. These included a custom software design tool, simple hardware modules, cardboard electronics, sample workshop formats, and project ideas. Early Paper Mechatronics activities—from a percussion workshop to a cereal hackathon and a Robot Petting Zoo—showed encouraging results with after school youth (ages 12-18) and museum visitors.

Mechanical duck designed with Paper Mechatronics.

Robot Petting Zoo.

Paper Mechatronics engaged participants in key engineering design practices (design, build, test), though learners were challenged by translating their visions into mechanical actions. So, to support designers who had no electronics or computer-aided design background and limited computer programming experience, Ph.D. student HyunJoo Oh designed FoldMecha, which generates paper-based templates for a number of design parameters such as shape, size, and type of motor movements that can be cut out with a paper or laser cutter.

 The new project will expand and improve this early Paper Mechatronics design software for modeling mechanical components and movements and create a new Paper Mechatronics kit with instructional resources, electronically enhanced crafting materials, low-cost microcontrollers and accessories, and custom design software.

Our research goal is to explore how to support novice designers in learning from the Paper Mechatronics kit and study how youth develop adaptive expertise, including knowledge-seeking, resourcefulness, confidence, and persistence. We’ll research how on-ramps to engineering design activities like engaging in paper mechatronic design activities help youth develop adaptive expertise and what types of instructional resources and scaffolding are most useful in supporting learners to be creative in engineering design.

My Daughter Heard About an Earthquake. How Do I Explain It?

Earthquakes occur worldwide daily, and their aftereffects vary widely, from minimal to devastating. From California to the Mediterranean, some communities live with the threat and consequences of earthquakes and their aftershocks on a regular basis. Understanding what causes an earthquake is not easy. How is it possible to visualize monumental slabs of Earth moving? And why do we need to?

On June 12, 2017, newspapers worldwide reported on a 6.3 magnitude earthquake south of the island of Lesbos, Greece (off the western coast of Turkey). The quake caused widespread structural damage as well as loss of life, and it drew considerable attention, in part, because of the large number of migrants on Lesbos. How to house and care for the affected migrants and residents became a major international challenge.

But according to the USGS, the earthquake was “the result of normal faulting in the shallow crust.” The Lesbos quake was traumatic, but not unexpected. Greece and Turkey are particularly earthquake prone because they are on active fault lines. The Mediterranean region is seismically active due to the convergence of the African plate to the south with the Eurasian plate to the north. The African plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate at a place called the Hellenic Trench.

That’s a lot to understand, let alone visualize. When a seismic event occurs, how can a teacher explain such monumental movements of the Earth to middle school students? Typically, it’s been done with drawings and detailed descriptions, such as the excellent resources available from the USGS. But earthquakes and other geologic events are about movement, happening far out of sight. The Concord Consortium’s GEODE project is creating a way to visualize the Earth’s movements using an interactive, dynamic computer model of tectonic plates.

Another GEODE model — the Seismic Explorer — allows users to see the pattern of earthquakes worldwide, including their magnitude and depth. The Lesbos quake and many others, as well as towns and cities, are visible.

The GEODE project is still researching and developing the best ways for kids to learn about Earth’s big movements. But why is it important? Because the consequences of these movements can crumble buildings and cause loss of life. Understanding patterns of Earth’s movement may help lead to better forecasting, preparedness, and response.

Remembering Robert F. Tinker

Concord Consortium Senior Research Scientist Sherry Hsi remembers our founder Bob Tinker who passed away on June 21st. For more personal stories about Bob and his impact, and to share your own, visit rememberingbob.concord.org

Barbara, Bob, and Sherry

The Concord Consortium East Coast Office – Me, Bob Tinker, and Barbara Tinker, August 2016

There are few times in the world when you can say you met a person who has changed your life. I’ve had the benefit of many wonderful mentors in my life, but Bob Tinker was the mentor who was my academic non-academia father. In 1996, I was in graduate school at UC Berkeley when I first met Bob. Marcia Linn brought me to SRI International where Roy Pea was convening different stakeholders to share the possible formation of a center for innovative learning technologies. Bob was so enthusiastic and energetic about ideas. Unlike others in the room, Bob wasn’t wearing a suit or tie. He was wearing a vest adorned with buttons, one of which read “Go VHS!” (for Virtual High School). He looked more like an activist. He was fighting for social justice, equal opportunity, and science education.

Bob invited me to visit the Concord Consortium shortly after the nonprofit opened on 37 Thoreau Street in Concord, Massachusetts. This is where I first met Ray Rose, Sarah Haavind, Bruce Droste, Carolyn Staudt, George Collison, and other education technology thought leaders. Netscape Navigator was two years old, yet the team was already implementing a model international online STEM professional development program for teachers and architecting the first virtual high school.

That was just the beginning of a wonderful adventure and mentorship. Bob and I would chat about crazy ideas like putting wireless cameras on birds and nestboxes, using mobile devices for citizen science, or designing smart museum exhibits that would be aware and responsive to visitor interactions. He would share with me drafts of how an idea – always in his signature blue Palatino font – would be iteratively shaped into a winning proposal. He showed how the most daunting and intimidating problems could be made accessible if you were willing to go back to core ideas, build models, and tinker a while without the fear of failure.

During my postdoc with the Concord Consortium and the Center for Innovative Learning Technologies, we explored ways to design and scaffold science inquiry using probes and handhelds in creeks and watersheds. We also sparked and seeded projects to grow the capacity of educational mobile STEM designers by hosting a design competition at the Exploratorium. (The winning app simulated the results of cross-breeding different fish on Palm Pilots.) Bob joined remotely to the live webcast by telephone. I remember how his super amplified voice boomed over the audience like a television voice from God, enthusiastic about the potential that collaborative learning and mobile devices could have on education.

Bob was the reason I left K-12 classroom research to work at the Exploratorium. He spent a few weeks of of the year in 1998 as an Osher Fellow when the museum was led by Goery Delacote, fellow physicist. He contributed to ideas during the formation of the Center for Media and Communication where I subsequently accepted a research position. He and Rob Semper asked what-if questions around the possibility of supporting deeper visitor engagement within the museum and extended science learning beyond. What if the whole museum had ubiquitous wireless access and fast networks for media sharing? Imagine that when 802.11b was new! This led to the Electronic Guidebook Project and a strand of early experiments to test inquiry using handhelds, RFID, cameras, and beacons with exhibits. Today, this pioneering work continues to re-emerge in different forms across many museums.

Bob was more than an academic mentor. He and his wife Barbara invited me into their home, lifted my spirits when life got tough, and pushed me back out into the world. Our most recent collaboration was working together on an NSF-funded project to bring Internet-of-Thing sensors and actuators into laboratories for high school biology to support science and engineering practices together with computational thinking. This brought me back to the Concord Consortium, but this time, in the West Coast office. Unlike when we first met, high-speed multi-site web video conferencing was now possible with a single click. The Maker movement now gave us so many low-cost DIY options to play with. We spent the last year connecting and chatting by Zoom from his workshop in Amherst.

I will miss his chortling, his outbursts about Reagan, his spreadsheet genius, his photography of nature, and his genuine care in all people. I enjoyed chasing ideas and money together, but my favorite memories are seeing him race down Pier 15 with my youngest son Lucas to see fog appear, hearing him hum and wash the dishes while Barbara and I played Schubert after dinner in Carlisle, and sneaking out of a PI meeting for a moment to watch a rainbow form right after a rain shower. He was always willing to share the last piece of toffee or ask for two spoons when he ordered dessert.

Bob – wherever you are, I hope you are flying high. Thanks for helping me grow. You gave me so many gifts and words of encouragement along the way. I feel lucky that our paths crossed in this large chaotic universe. You are one of a kind. I miss you terribly.

VHS Faculty

VHS online faculty: Bob McLean, Ray Rose, Bruce Droste, Me, Sarah Haavind and others waiting to meet Senator John Kerry October 1997.

Exploratorium Palace

Bob Tinker with Bernard Osher and Sally Duensing at the Exploratorium Palace of Fine Arts in 1998. Photo credit: Ron Hipschmann

Center for Innovative Learning Technologies

Center for Innovative Learning Technologies created in 1997. Slide credit: Roy Pea

Center for Innovative Learning Technologies

Center for Innovative Learning Technologies created in 1997.

Barbara and Bob Tinker

My academic non-academia parents Barbara and Bob Tinker at Aaron’s wedding in 2006.

Handheld Design Awards for Education

Live webcast of the Handheld Design Awards for Education at the Exploratorium, San Francisco Palace of Fine Arts, 1999.

Judging and handheld demonstrations at the Exploratorium in 1999

Judging and handheld demonstrations at the Exploratorium in 1999. Left: Phil Vahey, Justin Manus, Jeff Hawkins, Me; Right: Stephen Bannasch and Carolyn Staudt demoing probeware from the Concord Consortium

Marcia Linn and Bob Tinker

Marcia Linn and Bob Tinker at a Technology-Enhanced Learning in Science (TELS) event, Washington, D.C.

A typical web video conference

A typical web video conference when collaboratively working through hard problems together – Robert Tinker, Me, Hee-Sun Lee, and Chad Dorsey – October, 2016.

Bob Tinker at the March for Science

Bob Tinker at the March for Science in Amherst, MA – April 22, 2017. Photo credit: Barbara Tinker

Global Researchers and Developers Connect at 2017 Data Science Education Technology Conference

Over 100 thought leaders from organizations around the U.S. and four continents gathered from February 15 to 17 to generate important innovations needed in technology and teaching and learning at the Concord Consortium’s first Data Science Education Technology conference. Senior researchers, educators, and scientists from as far as Nigeria and New Zealand convened at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, California, to share a comprehensive overview of this rapidly growing area of data science education.

“This is a thrilling milestone,” notes Chad Dorsey, president and CEO of the Concord Consortium. “Never before have experts across mathematics, science, and technology come together to focus their thinking on the emerging field of data science education.”  

Dan Damelin, William Finzer, and Natalya St. Clair of the Concord Consortium.

Some of the 100 DSET Conference attendees.

Over the next few decades, data science education is expected to undergo a profound change. According to opening panelist Deb Nolan, UC Berkeley is offering an Intro to Data Science Class with enrollment of over 700 students in it, and there is currently a campus-wide initiative to plan for a data science major. In addition, the National Science Foundation has included Harnessing Data for 21st Century Science and Engineering as a priority in a “10 Big Ideas for Future Investments” report.

To reflect the dual-sided nature of this new territory in education, the conference topics comprised two strands. The Teaching and Learning strand, designed for those considering data science-related curriculum development, brought together researchers and educators, and generated a wealth of new understandings and patterns for educational research—educators in particular left with fresh ideas on how to apply cutting-edge curriculum practices in their classroom. Researchers left with important ideas about how to define success for educational results in this fast-growing and essential research field.

“Data science is evolving. And data science education is a science on its own, which can reach out to all branches of science and similar social sciences. Already I see people here who are trying to brainstorm ways we can move ahead on data science and how we can move forward to educate people on data science,” says Kenechukwu Okeke of Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nigeria.

In the Technology strand, participants worked with data analysis platforms such as Tuva, Desmos, and CODAP (the Common Online Data Analysis Platform). Participants with software experience created their own CODAP plug-ins and also built skills to make their work more efficient. In the closing session, DSET participants watched as Ph.D. student Takahiko Tsuchiya (Georgia Institute of Technology) made data in CODAP audible as sound using a sonification plug-in he had programmed during the conference.

Register now for CADRE Webinar on DSET conference highlights

Join William Finzer, Daniel Damelin, and Natalya St. Clair of the Concord Consortium in a CADRE webinar Friday, March 3, from 1-2 pm EST for highlights from the DSET conference. Register now!

Join us at future DSET Meetups

We’ll continue to gather thought leaders in data science education technology through informal meetups in Austin, San Antonio, Los Angeles, Portland, Baltimore, and New Zealand. Going to SXSW Edu, NCTM, or NSTA? Contact us for more information about upcoming meetups. We look forward to seeing you!

 

Data Science Education Technology Conference ready to welcome 100 thought leaders

We are proud to announce the Data Science Education Technology (DSET) Conference to be held February 15-17, 2017, at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, CA. Over 100 thought leaders from a range of organizations, including UC Berkeley, TERC, EDC, Desmos, SRI, Exploratorium, New York Hall of Science, Harvard’s Institute for Applied Computational Science, Lawrence Hall of Science, and Tuva will be in attendance at this groundbreaking event in the emerging field of data science education.

Conference attendees come from 15 states and 6 countries around the world. Map created with CODAP. View the data table and more information about attendees in this CODAP document.

“Data and analytics hold promise for revolutionizing all aspects of learning,” Chad Dorsey, president and CEO of the Concord Consortium, explains. “As we enter a world where practically every decision and moment of the day will connect to data in some way, preparing learners to explore, understand, and communicate with data must become a key national priority.”

The DSET conference addresses these new opportunities by focusing on two strands. The Teaching and Learning strand is designed for those thinking about curriculum development. This strand addresses the pedagogical challenges and opportunities associated with making use of data technologies in educational settings. Sessions will include data-driven learning experiences and discussion of lessons learned by curriculum designers. “It’s an exciting time to design activities to help students be ready for data science in the future,” notes Tim Erickson of Epistemological Engineering.

The Technology strand is designed especially for those with programming experience and focuses on software development. Attendees will build relevant, timely skills and learn to create a web app and increase efficiency. William Finzer, developer of the Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) at the Concord Consortium, will lead a session on data technology integration with online curricula and moderate a discussion on leveraging open-source software to enhance learners’ experience working with data.

You’re invited to attend the conference as a virtual participant. Registration is free! Join the virtual conference!

Register for the Virtual Conference

Where else can I connect with #dsetonline?

Virtual attendees are encouraged to join the conference backchannel social media conversation that will run concurrently with the face-to-face conference.

Teaching about water quality and the importance of fresh water

A new resolution may overturn the Interior Department’s “Stream Protection Rule,” which required coal mining companies to monitor and test the quality of local streams and rivers before, during, or after mining operations. There is no better time than the present to learn about the importance of water issues in our communities and environment. Three Concord Consortium projects focus on teaching middle and high school students about their local watersheds, careers in environmental conservation, and freshwater availability, and all of them offer free, high-quality resources ideal for classrooms or informal education settings.

The Teaching Environmental Sustainability: Model My Watershed project, a collaborative research project at the Concord Consortium, Millersville University, and the Stroud Water Research Center, has developed curricula for environmental/geoscience disciplines for high school classrooms, using the Model My Watershed (MMW) web-based application. The curricula also integrate low-cost environmental sensors, allowing students to collect and upload their own data and compare them to data visualized on the new MMW.

In Supporting Collaborative Inquiry, Engineering, and Career Exploration with Water (Water SCIENCE), middle school students from southern Arizona, central valley California, southeastern Pennsylvania, and eastern Massachusetts complete hands-on science and engineering activities, receive guidance and instruction from undergraduate and graduate student mentors, interact online with STEM professionals, and learn about careers in environmental conservation and engineering while investigating their community’s local water resources.

Melinda Daniels, Associate Research Scientist at the Stroud Water Research Center, describes her work. Watch additional videos about water scientists and environmental conservationists »

And in our High-Adventure Science project, we’ve developed a unit entitled “Will there be enough fresh water?” Students explore the distribution and uses of fresh water on Earth. They run experiments with computational models to explore the flow of groundwater, investigate the relationship of groundwater levels to rainfall and human impact, and hear from a hydrologist working on the same question. Students think about how to assess the sustainability of water usage locally and globally while considering their own water usage. Use these great resources today to help students understand critical water issues!

Aquifers

Students use computational models to explore water extraction from aquifers in urban and rural areas.

By Popular Demand: Printable NGSS Pathfinder

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) provide a framework and examples of three-dimensional learning. Soon after they were released, we created the NGSS Pathfinder to help educators find their way through the core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices that make up the NGSS. This intuitive tool allows you to consider some of the myriad paths possible, and links to free Concord Consortium resources for any given path.

NGSS Pathfinder

We’ve had lots of positive feedback about the NGSS Pathfinder, including many requests for a printable version. And since we love to give educational resources away for free, we’ve made a printable version of the Pathfinder available. Feel free to use it for handouts, full-size posters, or anything else. We’re especially excited about the idea of people creating laminated posters so they can draw their own paths!

As always, you can continue to use the online NGSS Pathfinder to create interactive links from core ideas to science and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts, and get access to free resources for your selected path. Our computational models and probe-based activities bring important learning within new reach. Students using such technology-based activities also gain wide experience with crosscutting concepts—from scales in space and time to energy and systems—across domains in science, math, and engineering.

The NGSS Pathfinder graphics are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (CC BY 4.0), so you’re welcome to use them under those terms. If you share the graphics online, please attribute the Concord Consortium and include a link to https://concord.org.

5 Reasons to Vote in STEM For All Video Showcase

We’re thrilled to present five videos in the National Science Foundation STEM for All Video Showcase from May 17 to 23! We invite you to view the videos and join the conversation about the latest research in STEM and computer science teaching and learning. Please vote for our videos through Facebook, Twitter, or email!

CODAPCODAP

Data are everywhere, except in the classroom! Learn how our Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) is bringing more rich experiences with data to more teachers and students.

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Teaching TeamworkTeaching Teamwork

Collaboration is highly valued in the 21st century workplace. Our Teaching Teamwork project is measuring how effectively electronics students work in teams.

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GeniverseGeniConnect & GeniGUIDE

Geniverse engages students in exploring heredity and genetics by breeding virtual dragons. GeniConnect connects afterschool students with biotech scientists to play Geniverse together. In GeniGUIDE, we’re adding an intelligent tutoring system to Geniverse, supporting students and relaying information to the most intelligent tutor in the room – the teacher.

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Teaching Environmental Sustainability with Model My WatershedTeaching Environmental Sustainability
with Model My Watershed

Teaching Environmental Sustainability with Model My Watershed is developing place-based, problem-based, hands-on set tools aligned to NGSS to promote geospatial literacy and systems thinking for middle and high school students.

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GRASPGRASP

GRASP (Gesture Augmented Simulations for Supporting Explanations) is investigating how middle school students use body movement to build deeper reasoning about critical science concepts.

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