Author Archives: The Concord Consortium

14 Chances at NSTA 2018 to Learn about Our Work

Are you attending the 2018 NSTA annual conference in Atlanta March 15-18? We’re leading 10 presentations at the Georgia World Congress Center (GWCC) and the Omni Atlanta Hotel at the CNN Center and one short course at the Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel. Something for everyone, from modeling science in kindergarten to data science education. Join us for one or more sessions. We’re giving out free STEM resources for K-14! Schedule is below.

Calling all teachers! We want to talk with you at #NSTA18. Tell us what you like about our STEM resources and what could be improved. Don’t miss this chance to give us a piece of your mind! Please complete this short survey to register your interest in connecting with us. We’ll contact you to arrange a short meeting in Atlanta.

You can also tweet your thoughts to @ConcordDotOrg or email projects@concord.org.

THURSDAY, March 15

8:00-9:00 AM, GWCC, A401
“Sensing Science Through Modeling Matter for Kindergarten Students”
Discover models, probes, and online interactive stories.

12:30-1:00 PM, GWCC, A410
“Argumentation and Modeling in Earth Science Using Free Online Modules”
Free Earth system and environmental science simulations and curricula.

3:00-6:00 PM, Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel, Chastain C
SHORT COURSE SC-1: If You Can Think It, You Can Model It
Use our popular SageModeler for modeling complexity and examining behavior.
You can purchase tickets online for this course.

5:00–6:00 PM, GWCC, A408
“Using Models to Support STEM Learning in Grades K–5: Examples and Insights from NSF’s DRK–12 Program”
Discussion centers on research-based examples of how students can engage in modeling in the elementary grades.

FRIDAY, March 16

8:00 AM, GWCC, A301
“Precipitating Change: Embedding Weather into the Middle School Science Classroom”
Everybody has weather! Make meteorology part of STEM learning.

8:00 AM, GWCC, A402
“Using Models to Support STEM Learning in Grades 6-12: Examples and Insights from NSF DRK-12 Program”
What does the research say about modeling practice?

9:30 AM, GWCC, C213
“Powerful Free Simulations for 3-D NGSS Teaching”
Free tips and resources for molecular simulations and curricula.

9:30 AM, GWCC, A301
“Teaching Environmental Sustainability Using a Free Place-Based Watershed Model”
Explore your local watershed with a web-based application.

2:00 PM, GWCC, B102
“NGSS@NSTA Forum Session: Interactions – A Free 3-D Science Curriculum for 9th Grade Physical Science
Atoms and molecules are the foundation to explaining scientific and everyday phenomena.

4:00 PM, Dantanna’s Downtown, One CNN Center, Suite 269
Join our informal Data Science Education Meetup. Get a bite to eat and talk with others about how to empower students with data science skills. And don’t miss tomorrow’s 9:30 AM presentation on data science and CODAP. RSVP dset@concord.org

5:00–6:00 PM, GWCC A301
“Model My Watershed: Using Real Data to Make Watershed Decisions”
Learn about an exciting free online modeling application that gives anyone the ability to use STEM practices to explore their local watershed.

SATURDAY, March 17

9:30 AM, Omni Atlanta Hotel at the CNN Center, Dogwood A
“Introducing Students to Data Science with Simulations & Interactive Graphing”
No coding required! Learn about CODAP (Common Online Data Analysis Platform), a free online tool for data analysis.

12:30 PM, GWCC, A313
“Systems Thinking, Modeling and Climate Change”
Explore a free, open-source modeling tool for climate change. Free e-book, too!

2:00 PM, GWCC, C206
“Liven Up Your Labs with Free 3-D Learning Tools and Resources”
Learn science by doing science. Adapt your labs using new tools.

Computational Thinking in Biology: What is an InSPECT Dataflow Diagram?

Integrating computational thinking into core science content and practices is a major goal of our InSPECT project, which is developing hands-on high school biology investigations using simple electronic sensors with Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity—a far cry from the simple germination experiments students usually encounter.

An article in the Fall 2017 Concord Consortium newsletter (“Science Thinking for Tomorrow Today”) describes the overall InSPECT project. Let’s take a closer look at a unique and powerful component of the project: virtual programming using a dataflow diagram.

The Dataflow interface enables students to do virtual programming within the browser-based interface. 

Dataflow diagrams have been around since the 1970s. They’re a visual model of the “flow” of data through a system. InSPECT has created a diagramming environment called Dataflow, the first version of which was developed in partnership with Peter Sand at Manylabs, that is much more than boxes and arrows on a page; components come alive when wirelessly synced to sensors, whose numerical data are displayed on the screen in real time as it’s recorded.

An eco-column activity includes sensors plugged into a Raspberry Pi computer. Dataflow automates data collection and initiates actions, such as raising or lowering temperature.

InSPECT is piloting an eco-column activity that includes electronic sensors plugged into a low-cost Raspberry Pi computer the size of a credit card. The sensors collect data about conditions inside the eco-column chambers, such as humidity and oxygen levels, sending it wirelessly over the Internet to Dataflow, which can automate data collection 24 hours a day, uninterrupted and unattended.

With the addition of actuators, Dataflow also can be programmed to create actions based on the sensor data. Students control the real-world actuators by defining variables and setting up conditionals that are entered directly into Dataflow’s simple, visual interface, which can run in any browser on a Mac or PC platform. For example, students can program a Dataflow diagram to adjust the current to a Peltier cooler in order to tweak the temperature of an eco-chamber when the sensor reading becomes too low or too high.

Finally, students can visualize, analyze, and interpret their data by exporting it to one of Concord Consortium’s most popular tools, CODAP (Common Online Data Analysis Platform), a free web-based environment for data analysis. Dataflow can be embedded directly into CODAP.

The use of sensor technology is still new to many biology classes, but our early research is based on the idea that when students collect data in real time, they make a powerful connection to the concepts they are studying. Using Dataflow, students not only learn to design the experiment and control the variables, they come to understand dynamic ecological systems.

The InSPECT project is currently recruiting biology teachers for our fall 2018 and spring 2019 studies. Our goal is to explore how to support integrated science practices and computational thinking in biology. We have several labs to select from involving photosynthesis, respiration, seed germination, and/or plant growth in chambers that can be from three classes to four weeks long. If you’re interested, contact us at inspect@concord.org.

Concord Consortium Publishes Important Research in Educational Technology

Nine publications illuminate our research in educational technology in 2017. Learn about engineering design tools that may help bridge the design-science gap (#5), a systems modeling tool that supports students in the NGSS practice of developing and using models and the crosscutting concept of systems (#1), an Earth science curriculum that increases student scientific argumentation abilities (#6), the relative ease of creating hierarchical data structures (#9), automated analysis of collaborative problem solving in electronics (#8), and more.

1. New systems modeling tool supports students

The NGSS identify systems and system models as one of the crosscutting concepts, and developing and using models as one of the science and engineering practices. However, students do not naturally engage in systems thinking or in building models to make sense of phenomena. The Concord Consortium and Michigan State University developed a free, web-based, open-source systems modeling tool called SageModeler and a curricular approach designed to support students and teachers in engaging in systems modeling.

Damelin, D., Krajcik, J., McIntyre, C., & Bielik, T. (2017). Students making system models: An accessible approach. Science Scope, 40(5), 78-82.

2. Students should face the unknown and engage in frontier science questions

Students should see science as an ongoing process rather than as a collection of facts. Six High-Adventure Science curriculum modules provide an opportunity to bring contemporary science and the process of doing science into the classroom. Interactive, dynamic models help students make sense of complex Earth systems. Embedded assessments prompt students to interpret data to make scientific arguments and evaluate claims while considering the uncertainty inherent in frontier science.

Pallant, A. (2017). High-Adventure Science: Exploring evidence, models, and uncertainty related to questions facing scientists today. The Earth Scientist, 33, 23-28.

3. Automated feedback helps students write scientific arguments

Automated scoring and feedback support students’ construction of written scientific arguments while learning about factors that affect climate change. Results showed that 77% of students made revisions to their open-ended argumentation responses after receiving feedback. Students who revised had significantly higher final scores than those who did not, and each revision was associated with an increase on the final scores.

Zhu, M., Lee, H.-S., Wang, T., Liu, O. L., Belur, V., & Pallant, A. (2017). Investigating the impact of automated feedback on students’ scientific argumentation. International Journal of Science Education, 1–21.

4. Review of research on women’s underrepresentation in computing fields

This literature review synthesizes research on women’s underrepresentation in computing fields across four life stages: 1) pre-high school; 2) high school; 3) college major choice and persistence; and 4) postbaccalaureate employment. Access to and use of computing resources at the pre-high school and high school levels are associated with gender differences in interest and attitudes toward computing. In college, environmental context contributes to whether students will major in computing, while a sense of belonging and self-efficacy as well as departmental culture play a role in persistence in computing fields. Work-life conflict, occupational culture, and mentoring/networking opportunities play a role in women’s participation in the computing workforce.

Main, J. B., & Schimpf, C. (2017). The underrepresentation of women in computing fields: A synthesis of literature using a life course perspective. IEEE Transactions on Education, 60(4), 296-304.

5. Students improve knowledge by designing with robust engineering tools

Eighty-three 9th grade students completed an energy-efficient home design challenge using our Energy3D software. Students substantially improved their knowledge. Their learning gains were positively associated with three types of design actions—representation, analysis, and reflection—measured by the cumulative counts of computer logs. These findings suggest that tools are not passive components in a learning environment, but shape design processes and learning paths, and offer possibilities to help bridge the design-science gap.

Chao, J., Xie, C., Nourian, S., Chen, G., Bailey, S., Goldstein, M. H., Purzer, S., Adams, R. S., & Tutwiler, M. S. (2017). Bridging the design-science gap with tools: Science learning and design behaviors in a simulated environment for engineering design. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 54(8), 1049-1096.

6. Students improve their scientific argumentation skills

Making energy choices means considering multiple factors, exploring competing ideas, and reaching conclusions based on the best available evidence. Our High-Adventure Science project created a free online energy module in which students compare the effects of energy sources on land use, air quality, and water quality using interactive models, real-world data on energy production and consumption, and scaffolded argumentation tasks. We analyzed pre- and post-test responses to argumentation items for 1,573 students from three middle schools and seven high schools. Students significantly improved their scientific argumentation abilities after using the energy module.

Pallant, A., Pryputniewicz, S. & Lee, H-S. (2017). The future of energy. The Science Teacher, 84(3), 61-68.

7. Students learn about sustainability

Educators must figure out how to prepare students to think about complex systems and sustainability. We elucidate a set of design principles used to create online curriculum modules related to Earth’s systems and sustainability and give examples from the High-Adventure Science module “Can we feed the growing population?” The module includes interactive, computer-based, dynamic Earth systems models that enable students to track changes over time. Embedded prompts help students focus on stocks and flows within the system, and identify important resources in the models, explain the processes that change the availability of the stock, and explore real-world examples.

Pallant, A., & Lee, H. S. (2017). Teaching sustainability through systems dynamics: Exploring stocks and flows embedded in dynamic computer models of an agricultural system. Journal of Geoscience Education, 65(2), 146-157.

8. Automated analysis sheds light on collaborative problem solving

The Teaching Teamwork project created an online simulated electronic circuit, running on multiple computers, to assess students’ abilities to work together as a team. Modifications to the circuit made by any team member, insofar as they alter the behavior of the circuit, can affect measurements made by the others. We log all relevant student actions, including calculations, measurements, online student communications, and alterations made by the students to the circuit itself. Automated analysis of the resulting data sheds light on the problem-solving strategy of each team.

Horwitz, P., von Davier, A., Chamberlain, J., Koon, A., Andrews, J., & McIntyre, C. (2017). Teaching Teamwork: Electronics instruction in a collaborative environment. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 41(6), 341-343.

9. Students understand how to structure data

In this study participants were presented with diagrams of traffic on two roads with information about eight attributes (e.g., type of vehicle, its speed and direction) and asked to record and organize the data to assist city planners in its analysis. Overall, 79% of their data sheets successfully encoded the data. Even 62% of the middle school students created a structure that could hold the critical information from the diagrams. Students were more likely to create nested data structures than they were to produce one flat table, suggesting that hierarchical structures might be more intuitive and easier to interpret than flat tables.

Konold, C., Finzer, W., & Kreetong, K. (2017). Modeling as a core component of structuring data. Statistics Education Research Journal, 16(2), 191-212.

The Concord Consortium’s Top 10 News Stories from 2017

The year 2017 was a significant one for the Concord Consortium. Even though we lost our founder—and an amazing friend, colleague, mentor, and collaborator—our memories of Robert Tinker and his work resonate in an enduring way. Not many people can say they’ve worked with a legend. But anyone who knew our beloved founder recognized they were in the presence of a brilliant mind and a person with genuine compassion. While Bob’s passing on June 21, 2017, is a source of sadness for us all, we honor his legacy every day through our work. Share your memory of how Bob inspired you (and read stories of the many people Bob inspired).

Here, we share our year’s top 10 news stories.

1. Data Science Education Leaps into the Future

We jump-started the new field of data science education to bring about effective learning with and about data. In February 2017 we convened the Data Science Education Technology conference in Berkeley, California—right next to our West Coast office—with over 100 thought leaders from organizations around the U.S. and six continents. We’ve also hosted over a dozen meetups and webinars since that seminal event. We’re planning our schedule for 2018 and invite you to help us bring about the data science education revolution.

2. We Publish Influential Research and Analysis

We published authoritative articles in the Earth Scientist, the International Journal of Science EducationIEEE Transactions on Education, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, the Science Teacher, the Journal of Geoscience Education, the Community College Journal of Research and Practice, the Statistics Education Research Journal, and Science Scope. We’re looking forward to 2018, too, with several papers scheduled to be published in the New Year.

3. We Embraced Our Creative Side and Reached Out to You

We embraced our creative side, and collaborated with Blenderbox to create a website that invites users to explore our work and use our free digital resources. Two jam-packed newsletters offered visionary commentary as well as practical instruction. We expanded our blog, and reached out to many more of you through Twitter and Facebook. Keep your shares and comments coming.

Energy3D can be used to design four types of concentrated solar power plants: solar power towers, linear Fresnel reflectors, parabolic troughs, and parabolic dishes.

4. General Motors Awards $200,000 Grant

General Motors is committed to powering its worldwide factories and offices with 100% renewable energy by 2050. The company furthered its commitment by awarding the Concord Consortium a $200,000 grant to promote engineering education using renewable energy as a learning context and artificial intelligence as a teaching assistant. The project will use our signature Energy3D software, an easy-to-use CAD tool for designing and simulating solar power systems.

5. What a Busy Year Presenting on the Road

We presented our free resources and research at over 25 sessions at NSTA, NARST, AERA, ISTE, BLC, American Society for Engineering Education, NSTA STEM Forum & Expo, MAST, EdSurge, International Dialogue on STEM 2017, and ISDDE2017, plus the Global Education & Skills Forum in Dubai and the International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interactions in Japan. Phew! At AERA 2018 we’ll host a special session to honor the work and legacy of Bob Tinker called “Deeply Digital Learning: The Influence of Robert Tinker on STEM Education and the Learning Sciences.”

Students can explore and evaluate the condition of their local watershed using the free, web-based Model My Watershed application.

6. We Won!

Congratulations to the WikiWatershed online toolkit, which includes the Model My Watershed app developed in collaboration with the Stroud Water Research Center. It was awarded the 2017 Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. And our Water SCIENCE project won a facilitators’ choice award in the National Science Foundation’s STEM for All Video Showcase.

7. We Partnered with Publishers to Bring STEM Inquiry Activities to More Students

  • We continued our partnership with McGraw-Hill Education to create engaging simulations for their Inspire Science elementary science curriculum. These simulations allow students to explore questions in ways that scientists and engineers do, and cover a variety of topic areas in K-5 science.
  • We incorporated our Next-Generation Molecular Workbench into PASCO’s Essential Chemistry textbook as fully interactive simulations that challenge students to explore topics in chemistry such as chemical reactions and particle motion.

If you’re interested in creating a groundbreaking STEM curriculum or pursuing an innovative new idea together, we’re excited to explore the possibilities with you.

     

8. Twenty-four Hours of Pandemonium and Prototypes

Our East and West Coast offices got together in July for a “FedEx day,” so called because the goal is to develop a blizzard of new prototypes and innovations in 24 hours and deliver them overnight! We developed prototypes for blocks-based programming in augmented reality (imagine Scratch/StarLogo, but with printable blocks that connect like puzzle pieces); a collaborative ecology game based on a tangible user interface; an internal project dashboard (think Intranet on steroids); an agent-based convection model; a way to connect real-time sensor data from our offices directly into our data exploration tool CODAP; and an open-source editor for activity transcripts. Plus President Chad Dorsey got out his power tools and built a picnic table that turns into a bench — almost Transformer-worthy.

    

   

9. Six New Employees Sign On

We welcomed six fabulous new employees in our Concord, MA, and Emeryville, CA, offices: Tom Farmer, Lisa Hardy, Eli Kosminsky, Andrea Krehbiel, Joyce Massicotte, and Judi Raiff. Want to join our growing family? We’re hiring!

10. Thirty-One Projects Research and Develop Educational Technology and Curriculum

Through 31 research projects with countless amazing collaborators, we’re extending our pioneering work in the field of probeware and other tools for inquiry and continuing to develop award-winning STEM models and simulations. We’re taking the lead in new areas, including data science education, analytics and feedback, and engineering and science connections. And we’re exploring and creating cutting-edge new tools and technologies for tomorrow’s learners in our innovation lab.

UMass Amherst students contribute to dragon genome project

Can dragons get cancer? Students in Dr. Ludmila Tyler’s Biochemistry Molecular Genetics and Genomics course at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst asked this question last semester. As part of their course work, they used our Geniverse software to study dragon genetics and develop new genes, mutant alleles, and phenotypes based on investigations of scientific literature. They imagined the genotypic and phenotypic possibilities for the fictional drake, the model species in Geniverse. Drakes are essentially miniature dragons, so students can take what they learn about drakes and apply it to dragons just as scientists study model species like mice to learn about human genetic disease.

We recently revealed the science behind the genes of Geniverse. Thanks to Dr. Tyler’s students, the dragon genome has the potential to expand in exciting ways.

  • Some drakes now have a high-frequency acoustic sensitivity, which gives them the ability to navigate and forage using sound waves—thanks to research conducted by Nicholas Fordham and Thomas Riley Potter. They focused on the SLC26A5 gene, which encodes Prestin, a protein that functions in the membrane of cochlear outer hair cells and is involved in auditory function. In bats and dolphins, a change in one amino acid in the Prestin protein allows for echolocation.
  • A form of dwarfism called achondroplosia was introduced to the drake genome by Brian Kim, Danny McSweeney, and Jared Stone. The group identified research showing a connection between short-limbed dwarfism and one altered amino acid in the FGFR3 transmembrane protein receptor expressed in bone-building cells. They created a drake with short stature due to a heterozygous genotype, containing a single mutated allele; the wild-type homozygous recessive genotype would result in an average-sized drake while a homozygous dominant genotype would result in the death of the drake offspring.
  • The MaSp1 gene now enables drakes to secrete and shoot silk from their mouths (for example, to capture prey or build a home). Brandon Hancock and Mitch Kimber researched the MaSp1 fibroin protein across several spider species to look for areas of gene conservation.
  • Drakes may now be resistant to cancerous tumors, thanks to research by Evan Smith and Kaitlyn Barrack, who added the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene. The gene encodes the p53 protein, which acts as a major tumor suppressant in many different organisms.

We’re excited that these students and other members of the class have extended the database of drake genes, and we’d love to be able to incorporate them in Geniverse software in the future.

Try Geniverse now. What additions to the dragon genome would you like to see?

Learn about two Concord Consortium projects at EdSurge Fusion Conference

Bill Finzer and Sherry Hsi will both present at the EdSurge Fusion Conference in Burlingame, California, near our Emeryville office.

The Common Online Data Analysis Platform—Getting more students in more classrooms to do more with data

William Finzer
Thursday, November 2
12:00 – 1:00 PM

CODAP is a free web-based data tool designed as a platform for developers and as an application for students in grades 6–14. Designed with learning in mind, CODAP continues the legacy of the award-winning software packages Fathom and TinkerPlots. It builds on a decades-long legacy of research into interactive environments encouraging exploration, play, and puzzlement. CODAP is about exploring and learning from data from any content area—from math and science to social studies or physical education!

The data set in CODAP has information on 27 mammals, including humans! Learn more by examining the tables and graphs.

Computationally-Enhanced Papercrafts for Engineering Education

Sherry Hsi
Thursday, November 2
12:00 – 1:00 PM

Paper Mechatronics is a novel design medium integrating traditional educational papercrafts with mechanical design, electronic engineering, and computational thinking. Paper mechatronics makes possible a craft-oriented approach to engineering and computing education that integrates key concepts from mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, control systems, and computer programming, while using paper as the primary material for learner design, exploration, and inquiry.

Watch how to create your own devices from cardboard – machines, robots, toys, automata, kinetic artwork – that move!

Learn about watersheds at MSELA Conference

Carolyn Staudt will present information about the NSF-funded Teaching Environmental Sustainability: Model My Watershed project and share free resources at the Massachusetts Education Leadership Association (MSELA) 2017 conference.

Friday, October 20, 8:00 – 9:15 AM
Courtyard Marriott in Marlborough, MA
Marlborough Salon E

The Teaching Environmental Sustainability: Model My Watershed project is a collaborative research project at the Concord Consortium, Millersville University, and the Stroud Water Research Center.

Together, we’re teaching a systems approach to problem solving through modeling and hands-on activities based on local watershed data and issues. The curricula also integrate low-cost environmental sensors, allowing students to collect and upload their own data and compare them to data visualized on the free Model My Watershed app.

If you’re wondering what a watershed is, you’re not alone. Simply put, a watershed is “all the land area where the rain runs downhill to a certain point,” explains Carolyn Staudt, who directs the Teaching Environmental Sustainability: Model My Watershed project at the Concord Consortium. She continues, “Water is shared—there are people upstream and downstream. What you do with your local watershed impacts everyone.”

Model My Watershed models human impacts on a watershed.

Learn more

MSELA conference
Teaching Environmental Sustainability: Model My Watershed
Part I: What is a Watershed?
Part II: Part II: Students Learn about Water . . .  and Take Action
Monday’s Lesson: Can you filter your water?

Speech technology in education research. Can you hear me now?

The primary way students and teachers interact in the classroom is through talking. A teacher poses a question, a student answers, followed by discussion, or argument. Back and forth, words are exchanged; ideas are refined and understood.

But unlike words on paper, spoken words disappear as soon as they are expressed. Even if the conversation is recorded, there has been no easy way to analyze each word—let alone the level of collaboration, motivation, and reasoning—outside of laboriously transcribing and coding limited interactions.

What if there were a way to electronically capture, measure, characterize, and understand all the words spoken in the classroom? How would access to that information inform education?

The Concord Consortium and its partners have begun exploring these questions. “Speech technology opens up whole new possibilities for analyzing what’s happening in the classroom,” explains Concord Consortium President and CEO Chad Dorsey. “Speech is the coin of the realm in education. For the most part, the core of teaching and learning has to happen when people are speaking to one another.”

The approaching convergence of speech technology and education has been in view for years. The field may not have reached a total convergence, but recent progress has at least made the impossible seem possible.

To assess the potential for speech technology for education research, the Concord Consortium, in 2015, partnered with leaders in spoken language technology research—SRI International and its Speech Technology and Research Laboratory and the Center for Robust Speech Systems at the University of Texas at Dallas—on a National Science Foundation grant to collate and examine current knowledge about speech recognition and analysis, and encourage collaborations that can launch the area of spoken language technology for education.   

For the past year, the partners have been holding focus groups with education and speech researchers to find out what’s already in place, what their hopes are for the future, and what gaps need to be filled to bridge the two. In January the Concord Consortium and SRI held a webinar, hosted by the Center for Innovative Research in CyberLearning (CIRCL), to share information about the potential for speech technology and education research. They have also published a summary of the field as a CIRCL primer. A paper for an educational research journal is in the works that will provide a broad analysis of speech technology and its use in education. Their hope is that bringing this new field out into the open will create “ah ha” moments that spur new collaborations.

However, the steps needed for a true convergence are many and complex. “There are four or five different stages that involve different kinds of technology that have all been maturing independently over years,” says Dorsey. The speech data has to be captured and turned into an appropriate digital format (no small task), and speech has to be distinguished from sound that is not speech, and one speaker from another. Once all that data has been successfully collected, how do you analyze and make sense of it?

The first step may be getting the education research community to recognize the tremendous unrealized potential of spoken language technologies for collecting word counts and performing keyword analysis, as well as evaluating collaboration, argumentation, teacher questioning, emotions, and social signals. It might also be possible to combine different types of data to create new knowledge. For example, combining data on overlapping speech and speech segments with question detection could yield information on whether a classroom is a student-centered classroom.

Consumer technologies like Siri and Alexa only scratch the surface of what’s currently available for research-quality engineering applications, but they have focused the public’s attention on speech technology. Dorsey is cautiously optimistic about the future and notes, “Once people realize this really is possible, it drives more research and work in the area.”

Speech technology and education has yet to mature into a fully formed interdisciplinary research field, but work has begun.

“Sometimes pushing big ideas forward takes understanding where the field is now and who the players are and the kinds of alliance needed for something to move from one step to the next,” says Dorsey.

The first step may be simply starting to talk.

STEM Resource Finder: Part IV – Student Reports

When your students begin to work through models and activities you have assigned to them, you can track their progress.

  1. Log in to the STEM Resource Finder and click the Home button.
  2. In the left-hand column, click the name of your class, then Assignments.
  3. Click on the drop-down list from all of the activities you’ve assigned to access the one you’re interested in.
  4. Each student’s progress in that activity is displayed in the orange progress bars.
  5. Click the Report button for a detailed summary report. (Reports are not available for some activities.)

Providing Electronic Feedback to Your Students

How do you give feedback to your students on their answers? Many teachers have printed out reports to provide feedback and grades. While you can still print reports, you now have the option to provide scores and feedback electronically.

Next to every question is a Provide Feedback button. Clicking this button will enable you to give either written feedback or a score to your students on questions of your choosing.

Your students will see your comments the next time they log in to their accounts. They can then use your feedback to improve their responses.

Comparing Student Responses

The report allows you to compare and project student responses. Scroll down to a question that you’d like to share with your class. After clicking Show responses, the question report will expand, displaying student responses below the question. Select the answers that you would like to compare and/or project. Click the Compare/project button.

This feature can be useful to show a range of answers to spur class discussion. Share model snapshots, multiple-choice selections, and open-response answers. Lead students in a discussion to try to figure out how the variables were tweaked in the model to result in the outcomes shared by snapshots. Help students to critique responses to learn about what makes a great scientific explanation.

And best of all, you can hide the students’ names from the projected view! Keeping it anonymous helps to keep the discussion about the content, not about the individual/group.

Additional information is available in the User Guide.

How will you use these features in your classroom? What other features would you want? Questions? Please share.

STEM Resource Finder: Part III – How to Use Models in Your Classroom

There are over 100 standalone models available in our STEM Resource Finder, which you can assign to your students.

Consider the following ways you might use them in your classroom.

  • Project a model for the whole class to see. Explore data and phenomena. For instance:
    • Look at the patterns of earthquakes and volcano locations in the Seismic Explorer model. Why do you think earthquakes happen where they do?
    • Look at the difference in heat transfer between well and poorly insulated buildings in the Well and Poorly Insulated Houses model. What makes for a well-insulated building?
    • Have the students make predictions of what will happen when a variable changes.
      • What will happen to the level of water vapor in the atmosphere when you reduce the level of human emissions in the Climate Change model?
      • How do you expect tillage to affect the amount of topsoil in the Land Management model?
      • How does molecular mass affect diffusion speed? Use the Diffusion and Molecular Mass model to find out!

Screenshot of Diffusion and Molecular Mass model.

  • Challenge your students to create an outcome in small group work. For example, have your students simulate a balloon’s flight from ground level to high altitude with our What is Pressure? model. Where should they remove atoms to simulate the balloon’s ascent?
  • Embed the link to a model (use the model’s Share feature!) in a shared Google Doc along with a question or two for review, enrichment, or homework.

These are just a few examples of what you can do with our scores of models. How do you use our models in your classroom? Share your ideas here. And let us know if you have any questions.