Author Archives: The Concord Consortium

Data Science Education Technology Conference ready to welcome 100 thought leaders

We are proud to announce the Data Science Education Technology (DSET) Conference to be held February 15-17, 2017, at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, CA. Over 100 thought leaders from a range of organizations, including UC Berkeley, TERC, EDC, Desmos, SRI, Exploratorium, New York Hall of Science, Harvard’s Institute for Applied Computational Science, Lawrence Hall of Science, and Tuva will be in attendance at this groundbreaking event in the emerging field of data science education.

Conference attendees come from 15 states and 6 countries around the world. Map created with CODAP. View the data table and more information about attendees in this CODAP document.

“Data and analytics hold promise for revolutionizing all aspects of learning,” Chad Dorsey, president and CEO of the Concord Consortium, explains. “As we enter a world where practically every decision and moment of the day will connect to data in some way, preparing learners to explore, understand, and communicate with data must become a key national priority.”

The DSET conference addresses these new opportunities by focusing on two strands. The Teaching and Learning strand is designed for those thinking about curriculum development. This strand addresses the pedagogical challenges and opportunities associated with making use of data technologies in educational settings. Sessions will include data-driven learning experiences and discussion of lessons learned by curriculum designers. “It’s an exciting time to design activities to help students be ready for data science in the future,” notes Tim Erickson of Epistemological Engineering.

The Technology strand is designed especially for those with programming experience and focuses on software development. Attendees will build relevant, timely skills and learn to create a web app and increase efficiency. William Finzer, developer of the Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) at the Concord Consortium, will lead a session on data technology integration with online curricula and moderate a discussion on leveraging open-source software to enhance learners’ experience working with data.

You’re invited to attend the conference as a virtual participant. Registration is free! Join the virtual conference!

Register for the Virtual Conference

Where else can I connect with #dsetonline?

Virtual attendees are encouraged to join the conference backchannel social media conversation that will run concurrently with the face-to-face conference.

Teaching about water quality and the importance of fresh water

A new resolution may overturn the Interior Department’s “Stream Protection Rule,” which required coal mining companies to monitor and test the quality of local streams and rivers before, during, or after mining operations. There is no better time than the present to learn about the importance of water issues in our communities and environment. Three Concord Consortium projects focus on teaching middle and high school students about their local watersheds, careers in environmental conservation, and freshwater availability, and all of them offer free, high-quality resources ideal for classrooms or informal education settings.

The Teaching Environmental Sustainability: Model My Watershed project, a collaborative research project at the Concord Consortium, Millersville University, and the Stroud Water Research Center, has developed curricula for environmental/geoscience disciplines for high school classrooms, using the Model My Watershed (MMW) web-based application. The curricula also integrate low-cost environmental sensors, allowing students to collect and upload their own data and compare them to data visualized on the new MMW.

In Supporting Collaborative Inquiry, Engineering, and Career Exploration with Water (Water SCIENCE), middle school students from southern Arizona, central valley California, southeastern Pennsylvania, and eastern Massachusetts complete hands-on science and engineering activities, receive guidance and instruction from undergraduate and graduate student mentors, interact online with STEM professionals, and learn about careers in environmental conservation and engineering while investigating their community’s local water resources.

Melinda Daniels, Associate Research Scientist at the Stroud Water Research Center, describes her work. Watch additional videos about water scientists and environmental conservationists »

And in our High-Adventure Science project, we’ve developed a unit entitled “Will there be enough fresh water?” Students explore the distribution and uses of fresh water on Earth. They run experiments with computational models to explore the flow of groundwater, investigate the relationship of groundwater levels to rainfall and human impact, and hear from a hydrologist working on the same question. Students think about how to assess the sustainability of water usage locally and globally while considering their own water usage. Use these great resources today to help students understand critical water issues!

Aquifers

Students use computational models to explore water extraction from aquifers in urban and rural areas.

By Popular Demand: Printable NGSS Pathfinder

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) provide a framework and examples of three-dimensional learning. Soon after they were released, we created the NGSS Pathfinder to help educators find their way through the core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices that make up the NGSS. This intuitive tool allows you to consider some of the myriad paths possible, and links to free Concord Consortium resources for any given path.

NGSS Pathfinder

We’ve had lots of positive feedback about the NGSS Pathfinder, including many requests for a printable version. And since we love to give educational resources away for free, we’ve made a printable version of the Pathfinder available. Feel free to use it for handouts, full-size posters, or anything else. We’re especially excited about the idea of people creating laminated posters so they can draw their own paths!

As always, you can continue to use the online NGSS Pathfinder to create interactive links from core ideas to science and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts, and get access to free resources for your selected path. Our computational models and probe-based activities bring important learning within new reach. Students using such technology-based activities also gain wide experience with crosscutting concepts—from scales in space and time to energy and systems—across domains in science, math, and engineering.

The NGSS Pathfinder graphics are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (CC BY 4.0), so you’re welcome to use them under those terms. If you share the graphics online, please attribute the Concord Consortium and include a link to https://concord.org.

5 Reasons to Vote in STEM For All Video Showcase

We’re thrilled to present five videos in the National Science Foundation STEM for All Video Showcase from May 17 to 23! We invite you to view the videos and join the conversation about the latest research in STEM and computer science teaching and learning. Please vote for our videos through Facebook, Twitter, or email!

CODAPCODAP

Data are everywhere, except in the classroom! Learn how our Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) is bringing more rich experiences with data to more teachers and students.

Watch Now

Teaching TeamworkTeaching Teamwork

Collaboration is highly valued in the 21st century workplace. Our Teaching Teamwork project is measuring how effectively electronics students work in teams.

Watch Now

GeniverseGeniConnect & GeniGUIDE

Geniverse engages students in exploring heredity and genetics by breeding virtual dragons. GeniConnect connects afterschool students with biotech scientists to play Geniverse together. In GeniGUIDE, we’re adding an intelligent tutoring system to Geniverse, supporting students and relaying information to the most intelligent tutor in the room – the teacher.

Watch Now

Teaching Environmental Sustainability with Model My WatershedTeaching Environmental Sustainability
with Model My Watershed

Teaching Environmental Sustainability with Model My Watershed is developing place-based, problem-based, hands-on set tools aligned to NGSS to promote geospatial literacy and systems thinking for middle and high school students.

Watch Now

GRASPGRASP

GRASP (Gesture Augmented Simulations for Supporting Explanations) is investigating how middle school students use body movement to build deeper reasoning about critical science concepts.

Watch Now

Video: Under the Hood of Molecular Workbench

It takes a lot of computation to model the atomic and molecular world! Fortunately, modern Web browsers have 10 times the computational capacity and speed compared with just 18 months ago. (That’s even faster than Moore’s Law!) We’re now taking advantage of HTML5 plus JavaScript to rebuild Molecular Workbench models to run on anything with a modern Web browser, including tablets and smartphones.

Director of Technology Stephen Bannasch describes the complex algorithms that he’s been programming behind the scenes to get virtual atoms to behave like real atoms, forming gases, liquids and solids while you manipulate temperature and the attractive forces between atoms. See salt crystallize and explore how the intermolecular attractions affect melting and boiling points. Imagine what chemistry class would have been like (or could be like today) if the foundation of your chemical knowledge started here.

Technology and Curriculum Developer Dan Damelin goes on to describe how open source programming opens up possibilities. For instance, Jmol is a Java-based 3D viewer for chemical structures that we were able to incorporate into Molecular Workbench to allow people to easily build activities around manipulation of large and small molecules, and to make connections between static 3D representations and the dynamic models of how molecules interact. We’re planning to build a chemical structure viewer that won’t require Java and will extend another open source project based on JavaScript and WebGL to visualize molecules in a browser.

Interested in this innovative programming? Great! We’re looking for software developers.

Video: Three Views of Molecular Workbench

The Molecular Workbench has been downloaded over 800,000 times, making it Concord Consortium’s most popular single piece of software. We’re heading to a million and documenting in video both our history and our vision for the future.

Learn from Charles Xie, Senior Scientist and creator of the Molecular Workbench, about the computational engines that accurately simulate atomic motions, quantum waves, and atomic-scale interactions based on fundamental equations and laws in physics.

Amy Pallant, who researched student use of Molecular Workbench, describes the phone calls she made to students months after they’d used the software—and how impressed she was with their memory of the science of atoms and molecules.

Dan Damelin, Technology and Curriculum Developer, recalls his time as a classroom teacher and his frustration with trying to describe atoms and molecules to his students with words and pictures. He wanted more—and found it in Molecular Workbench!

Dan sums up the goal for Molecular Workbench: “It’s going to be just a given that this is a regular tool that will just be part of learning science.” We hope so.

We’re closing in on a million downloads and looking toward the next million.