Tag Archives: CODAP

New CODAP Website

Check out our newly revamped CODAP website!

Our new CODAP website design. https://codap.concord.org

Our newly designed and upgraded CODAP website has a new and fresher look. Visit us at codap.concord.org

We hope you like our new CODAP website, which is designed to make it easier to find information about CODAP and data science education. In particular, we hope you like the design which, is more modern and is intended to be easy to navigate.

We wanted a new website to better collaborate with our CODAP community, including educators, software developers, partners, researchers, and curriculum developers. You are now able to post comments, CODAP questions, and share use cases on our CODAP forums. We check the forum every day to keep in touch with you about all the things happening related to what we’re most passionate about—helping our users work with each other in the emerging field of data science education!

In addition to our new website, we invite you to join us for our upcoming webinar series starting on May 30.

Our first speaker is Cliff Konold of SRRI Education. Cliff will lead a discussion entitled “Modeling as a core component of structuring data” based on an upcoming article (Konold, Finzer, & Kreetong, in press), which describes research on student understanding of and ability to organize complex data for analysis. We expect lively discussion with Cliff’s facilitation.

Please RSVP for our May 30 webinar using our Eventbrite page here.

We are continuing to update our help pages and example documents with useful information about our work and also hope to include useful information on data science education related issues, so please do check back with us for updates.

Please contact us at codap@concord.org to let us know what you think of our new website—all comments and feedback are welcome. Please also let us know if you cannot find something or would like to make any suggestions for new information or topics.

Many thanks for your ongoing support and we look forward to hearing from you!

Data Science Education Meetup at Cyberlearning 2017

Thank you to the fantastic crowd at Cyberlearning 2017 who attended our Data Science Education Meetup at Mussel Bar and Grill on Tuesday night. The Meetup provided an opportunity for members of the Cyberlearning community to discuss innovative ways that we could implement data science education into research and curriculum development, to address NSF’s 10 Big Ideas for Future Investments strand in data science [PDF], and to enjoy some great food!

Our attendees at the Data Science Education Meetup at Cyberlearning 2017

Attendees at the Data Science Education Meetup at Cyberlearning 2017

There were several strands of activity toward data science education at Cyberlearning 2017, and the Meetup provided an opportunity for us to share and reflect on the following:

  • A roundtable session on Teaching Data Science, in which our own William Finzer facilitated a discussion on our Data Science Education Technology conference in Berkeley in February.
  • Hearing about some of the challenges researchers face in implementing curriculum at the middle school and high school level, as well as some of the Cyberlearning projects (such as Data Science Games, CODAP, Impact Studio, Learning and Youth, and STEM Literacy Through Infographics), which are hoping to address these challenges.
  • Participating in the Data Science Education for 21st Century Learning CL17 Working Sessions Strand. It was especially great to work with Sayamindu Dasgupta and Jesse Bemley to identify the important aspects necessary to move data science education forward.
  • Identifying data science as part of computational thinking, as put forward by NSF Program Officer Arlene M. de Strulle on Wednesday morning.

Our Meetup was packed (we had to move to a larger set of tables, as a matter of fact!), and the evening was full of lively discussion about the impact and need for data science education. We thank everyone who attended and are especially grateful to our community for bringing in so much passion and energy for data science education.

Please check out our future Data Science Education Meetup dates and locations at concord.org/meetup. Or join us online through a series of monthly Data Science Education Webinars, starting in May. We have a great lineup of speakers, including Cliff Konold, Amelia McNamara, and Rob Gould. We’ll post dates and additional information at concord.org/meetup.

As always, please leave a comment or suggestion for future Meetups, community-building activities, or future innovations in data science education you’d like to see. We love hearing from you.

Global Researchers and Developers Connect at 2017 Data Science Education Technology Conference

Over 100 thought leaders from organizations around the U.S. and four continents gathered from February 15 to 17 to generate important innovations needed in technology and teaching and learning at the Concord Consortium’s first Data Science Education Technology conference. Senior researchers, educators, and scientists from as far as Nigeria and New Zealand convened at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, California, to share a comprehensive overview of this rapidly growing area of data science education.

“This is a thrilling milestone,” notes Chad Dorsey, president and CEO of the Concord Consortium. “Never before have experts across mathematics, science, and technology come together to focus their thinking on the emerging field of data science education.”  

Dan Damelin, William Finzer, and Natalya St. Clair of the Concord Consortium.

Some of the 100 DSET Conference attendees.

Over the next few decades, data science education is expected to undergo a profound change. According to opening panelist Deb Nolan, UC Berkeley is offering an Intro to Data Science Class with enrollment of over 700 students in it, and there is currently a campus-wide initiative to plan for a data science major. In addition, the National Science Foundation has included Harnessing Data for 21st Century Science and Engineering as a priority in a “10 Big Ideas for Future Investments” report.

To reflect the dual-sided nature of this new territory in education, the conference topics comprised two strands. The Teaching and Learning strand, designed for those considering data science-related curriculum development, brought together researchers and educators, and generated a wealth of new understandings and patterns for educational research—educators in particular left with fresh ideas on how to apply cutting-edge curriculum practices in their classroom. Researchers left with important ideas about how to define success for educational results in this fast-growing and essential research field.

“Data science is evolving. And data science education is a science on its own, which can reach out to all branches of science and similar social sciences. Already I see people here who are trying to brainstorm ways we can move ahead on data science and how we can move forward to educate people on data science,” says Kenechukwu Okeke of Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nigeria.

In the Technology strand, participants worked with data analysis platforms such as Tuva, Desmos, and CODAP (the Common Online Data Analysis Platform). Participants with software experience created their own CODAP plug-ins and also built skills to make their work more efficient. In the closing session, DSET participants watched as Ph.D. student Takahiko Tsuchiya (Georgia Institute of Technology) made data in CODAP audible as sound using a sonification plug-in he had programmed during the conference.

Register now for CADRE Webinar on DSET conference highlights

Join William Finzer, Daniel Damelin, and Natalya St. Clair of the Concord Consortium in a CADRE webinar Friday, March 3, from 1-2 pm EST for highlights from the DSET conference. Register now!

Join us at future DSET Meetups

We’ll continue to gather thought leaders in data science education technology through informal meetups in Austin, San Antonio, Los Angeles, Portland, Baltimore, and New Zealand. Going to SXSW Edu, NCTM, or NSTA? Contact us for more information about upcoming meetups. We look forward to seeing you!

 

Data Science Education Technology Conference ready to welcome 100 thought leaders

We are proud to announce the Data Science Education Technology (DSET) Conference to be held February 15-17, 2017, at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, CA. Over 100 thought leaders from a range of organizations, including UC Berkeley, TERC, EDC, Desmos, SRI, Exploratorium, New York Hall of Science, Harvard’s Institute for Applied Computational Science, Lawrence Hall of Science, and Tuva will be in attendance at this groundbreaking event in the emerging field of data science education.

Conference attendees come from 15 states and 6 countries around the world. Map created with CODAP. View the data table and more information about attendees in this CODAP document.

“Data and analytics hold promise for revolutionizing all aspects of learning,” Chad Dorsey, president and CEO of the Concord Consortium, explains. “As we enter a world where practically every decision and moment of the day will connect to data in some way, preparing learners to explore, understand, and communicate with data must become a key national priority.”

The DSET conference addresses these new opportunities by focusing on two strands. The Teaching and Learning strand is designed for those thinking about curriculum development. This strand addresses the pedagogical challenges and opportunities associated with making use of data technologies in educational settings. Sessions will include data-driven learning experiences and discussion of lessons learned by curriculum designers. “It’s an exciting time to design activities to help students be ready for data science in the future,” notes Tim Erickson of Epistemological Engineering.

The Technology strand is designed especially for those with programming experience and focuses on software development. Attendees will build relevant, timely skills and learn to create a web app and increase efficiency. William Finzer, developer of the Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) at the Concord Consortium, will lead a session on data technology integration with online curricula and moderate a discussion on leveraging open-source software to enhance learners’ experience working with data.

You’re invited to attend the conference as a virtual participant. Registration is free! Join the virtual conference!

Register for the Virtual Conference

Where else can I connect with #dsetonline?

Virtual attendees are encouraged to join the conference backchannel social media conversation that will run concurrently with the face-to-face conference.

New features in CODAP

Our Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) software provides an easy-to-use web-based data analysis tool, geared toward middle and high school students, and aimed at teachers and curriculum developers. CODAP is already full of amazing features. We’re excited to announce several new features! Continue reading

5 Reasons to Vote in STEM For All Video Showcase

We’re thrilled to present five videos in the National Science Foundation STEM for All Video Showcase from May 17 to 23! We invite you to view the videos and join the conversation about the latest research in STEM and computer science teaching and learning. Please vote for our videos through Facebook, Twitter, or email!

CODAPCODAP

Data are everywhere, except in the classroom! Learn how our Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) is bringing more rich experiences with data to more teachers and students.

Watch Now

Teaching TeamworkTeaching Teamwork

Collaboration is highly valued in the 21st century workplace. Our Teaching Teamwork project is measuring how effectively electronics students work in teams.

Watch Now

GeniverseGeniConnect & GeniGUIDE

Geniverse engages students in exploring heredity and genetics by breeding virtual dragons. GeniConnect connects afterschool students with biotech scientists to play Geniverse together. In GeniGUIDE, we’re adding an intelligent tutoring system to Geniverse, supporting students and relaying information to the most intelligent tutor in the room – the teacher.

Watch Now

Teaching Environmental Sustainability with Model My WatershedTeaching Environmental Sustainability
with Model My Watershed

Teaching Environmental Sustainability with Model My Watershed is developing place-based, problem-based, hands-on set tools aligned to NGSS to promote geospatial literacy and systems thinking for middle and high school students.

Watch Now

GRASPGRASP

GRASP (Gesture Augmented Simulations for Supporting Explanations) is investigating how middle school students use body movement to build deeper reasoning about critical science concepts.

Watch Now

Building data science fluency using games

The National Science Foundation has awarded the Concord Consortium a three-year Cyberlearning grant to develop and test new data science games for high school biology, chemistry, and physics, and research how learners conceive of and learn with data. The Data Science Games project builds on prior work, which led to the invention of a new genre of learning technology—a “data science game.”

The use of games for education is a growing field with significant promise for STEM learning. Games provide a powerful means of motivation and engagement, and align with many STEM learning goals. Data Science Games is making use of the data generated as students play digital games in a novel and creative way. When students play a data science game, their gameplay actions generate data—data that is essential to the game itself. To succeed at a data science game, students must visualize, understand, and properly apply the data their game playing has generated in order to “level up” and progress within the game. As they visualize and analyze the data, planning and plotting new, evolving strategies, students learn the fundamentals of data science.

The new data science games will be embedded in our open source Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP). Data from the games will flow seamlessly into CODAP thanks to innovations that leverage advances in the interoperability of components embedded in browsers, new capabilities for data visualization using HTML5, and recent innovations in design of interfaces compatible with both PC-based browsers and touch devices.

Project research will investigate ways this new genre of educational technology can be integrated into classroom learning. We will identify and characterize learner perceptions of data, including how learners see flat, hierarchical, and network structures as emerging from realistic problems; questions learners ask with data; and learning trajectories for restructuring and visualization of data.

The project will also produce guidelines for making use of data science games across a range of grade levels and subject matter. Data Science Games will thus provide both models and templates of how to integrate learning of data science into existing content areas, helping to grow the next generation of data scientists.

Data Science Games Play Roshambo against the evil Dr. Markov (log in as guest). If you win, you can save Madeline the dog. Improve your odds by analyzing Markov’s moves in a graph.

Play Roshambo
(log in as guest)

Open invitation to software developers

CODAP Screenshot Our Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) offers easy-to-use web-based software that makes it possible for students in grades 6 through college to visualize, analyze, and ultimately learn from data. Whether the source of data is a game, a map, an experiment, or a simulation, CODAP provides an immersive, exploratory experience with dynamically linked data representations, including graphs, maps, and tables. CODAP is not dependent on specific content, so data analysis can be integrated into math, science, history, or economics classrooms.

CODAP is HTML5, making use of JavaScript, HTML, and CSS3. Various open source libraries are part of CODAP, including SproutCore, JQuery, Raphaël, Leaflet, and several other smaller libraries. CODAP uses SproutCore as an application framework. You can deploy CODAP as a static website with no server interaction. CODAP can be configured to store documents on your local device, or integrated with an online server for cloud-based document management. It can also log user actions to a server specified in a configuration file.

Our goal is to create a community of curriculum and software developers committed to ensuring that students from middle school through college have the knowledge and skills to learn with data across disciplines. We need your help!

Get involved