Posts Tagged ‘GSoC’

Welcome to our three Google Summer of Code students

May 28th, 2013 by Cynthia McIntyre

Google Summer of Code 2013Three international students will spend the summer coding for our open source projects. Through Google Summer of Code (GSoC), they’ll earn stipends from Google, plus get a coveted GSoC t-shirt and certificate.

Expansion of SPARKS HTML5 circuit simulator

Our HTML5 breadboard simulator allows students to experiment with basic DC and AC circuits using linear components (resistors, capacitors, inductors) and to perform measurements with a function generator, a digital multimeter and an oscilloscope.

Sabareesh Nikhil C, from Hyderabad, India, will extend our existing circuit-solving code to handle non-linear components such as diodes, op amps and transistors. Instead of treating each circuit as a lumped impedance and computing its response to a single frequency, the new code will perform a more realistic time-based computation, which will enable it to model the behavior of more complex circuits. Sabareesh also plans to implement a communication protocol that will enable circuits on different computers to communicate with each other.

Sabareesh will work with Concord Consortium mentors Paul Horwitz, Sam Fentress and Richard Klancer.

Probe your browser!

Science classrooms use probes and sensors to enable real-time data collection by students. Currently we use Java applets to support communication between sensors and web-based applications in the browser. Increasingly limited support for Java is making it difficult to integrate probes and sensors that use Java software for use in the classroom.

Lingliang Zhang from New York, NY, and Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, will design a native application for desktops, which will make the data from probes and sensor hardware available to our browser-based JavaScript applications. The native application will use an embedded webserver to connect to our existing sensor library. This approach will enable browsers on desktops and laptops to use our currently supported Pasco and Vernier sensor devices without a Java applet.

He will work under the mentorship of our Senior Software Engineer Scott Cytacki.

Port HTML5 interactives to phones and tablets

Our HTML5 interactives are rendered using a semantic layout system. With a modified UI, they could work on phones, allowing students to interact with them on multiple devices. Additionally, with an iOS and Android application created using Cordova, users could install the interactives and use them offline. This app could also allow parts of the engine behind the interactives to run natively in order to get better performance on these devices.

Apoorv Narang from New Delhi, India, will measure performance on various devices to determine which of our HTML5 interactives can be run on these devices. He will improve our lab framework, which is the system that displays and runs interactives, with the goal of making our interactives look—and run!—better on phones.

Director of Technology Stephen Bannasch will mentor Apoorv.

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During summer 2012, we were fortunate to have two fabulous GSoC students, including Piotr Janik, who continues coding for us as a consultant. Watch Piotr describe his experience with Google Summer of Code.

We can’t wait to see the code that our three new GSoC students will develop this summer!

 

9 Highlights of 2012

January 3rd, 2013 by Cynthia McIntyre

It was a great year for the Concord Consortium!

  1. We won a Smaller Business Association of New England (SBANE) Innovation Award!
  2. Next-Generation Molecular Workbench interactives starred in the MIT MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) “Introduction to Solid State Chemistry” through a new collaboration with edX.
  3. Chad Dorsey described our vision of deeply digital education at the national Cyberlearning Research Summit.
  4. Six new projects were funded by the National Science Foundation: InquirySpace, Understanding Sub-Microscopic Interactions, High-Adventure Science: Earth’s Systems and Sustainability, GeniVille, Graph Literacy, and Sensing Science.
  5. The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), a federally funded organization that scans educational research for high-quality studies, recognized our Technology Enhanced Elementary and Middle School Science (TEEMSS) software and materials.
  6. The Concord Consortium Collection was accessioned into the National Science Digital Library (NSDL).
  7. Our debut webcast featured Chad Dorsey, speaking about the scientific and engineering practices of the Next Generation Science Standards and our free, technology-based activities.
  8. We had two fabulous Google Summer of Code students.
  9. Our staff population increased by 10%, thanks to our new Software Portfolio and Project Manager Jen Goree, Web Developer Parker Morse, and Software Developer Tom Dyer, who just started (technically in 2013, but we’re so excited, we’ve included him on this 2012 list)!

2013 promises to be another great year! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and subscribe to our mailing list to receive print or email news updates.

Google Summer of Code Development: Single Sign-On

October 18th, 2012 by Vaibhav Ahlawat

[Editor's note:  Vaibhav Ahlawat was a Google Summer of Code 2012 student at the Concord Consortium.]

At any time, the Concord Consortium runs a number of small research projects and large scale-up projects, but in the past we built each system separately and each required a separate login. Want to teach your fourth graders about evolution? Great. Log in at the Evolution Readiness portal. Wait, you also teach your students about the cloud cycle? That requires logging in at the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) portal.

Clearly, some students and educators find value across different projects, and my goal is to make it a little easier for them to sign in just once and get access to the myriad great resources at the Concord Consortium for teaching science, math and engineering. As a Google Summer of Code student, I’m working under the guidance of Scott Cytacki, Senior Software Developer, to bring different projects under a single authentication system or, in the language of software development, a Single Sign-On.

Single Sign-On will allow both students and teachers to login across different projects with a single username and password, doing away with the need to remember multiple usernames and passwords. They’ll be able to move seamlessly among projects and find the resources they need to teach and learn. I’m also working on code that will allow students and teachers to sign up and login to Concord Consortium’s portals with their existing Google+ or Facebook accounts.

For those who want technical details, read on.

I’m working on moving from Restful Authentication to Devise, both of which are authentication solutions for Rails. These days, Devise is the preferred one among the Rails community and it makes things like password resetting and confirmation email pretty easy. Once we are done with this conversion, adding the support for signup and login using Facebook and Google+ accounts should be simple. For example, to add support for Google Oauth2 authorization protocol, all we have to do is add a gem named omniauth with Oauth2 strategy, which works brilliantly with Devise, then write a couple of functions.

Here’s a snippet of my code, which adds google oauth2 support to Devise

class Users::OmniauthCallbacksController < Devise::OmniauthCallbacksController
    def google_oauth2
 
    # The User.find_for_google_oauth2 method also needs to be implemented.
    # It looks for an existing user by e-mail, or creates one with a random password
    @user = User.find_for_google_oauth2(request.env["omniauth.auth"], current_user)
 
    if @user.persisted?
      flash[:notice] = I18n.t "devise.omniauth_callbacks.success", :kind => "Google"
      sign_in_and_redirect @user, :event => :authentication
    else
      session["devise.google_data"] = request.env["omniauth.auth"]
      redirect_to new_user_registration_url
    end
  end
end
Including support for authentication using the Facebook API can be done simply. Support for Oauth, which is used by many learning management systems, is provided, making integration far more easier than it was before.

I’m happy to help make it easier for Concord Consortium’s resources to be used by many more people.

– By Vaibhav Ahlawat