Posts Tagged ‘Heat transfer’

Getting sensor data out of Energy2D

February 9th, 2014 by Charles Xie
Figure 1: Copy data from Energy2D.
Since a few users asked if the simulation data in Energy2D can be exported to other applications such as Excel, I have added a feature to the app for extracting virtual sensor data as multi-column time series data. For the user's convenience, there are three different ways of getting these data:
  1. When right-clicking on a sensor, the "View Data..." from the popup menu returns the data that has been recorded by the selected sensor.
  2. When right-clicking on a spot not occupied by a sensor, the "View Data..." from the popup menu returns a tabbed pane that contains all the sensor data -- different types of sensor are organized in different tabs.
  3. When the translucent graph is open, clicking the View Data button on the graph window's control panel returns the data recorded by all the sensors of the selected type, in consistent with the current display of the data in the graph window.
Figure 2: Paste data into Excel.
Regardless of which way you use, use the "Copy Data" button at the bottom of the data window to copy the data (Figure 1) and paste it into Excel. Once you get the data into Excel, you can process and plot them in any way you want (Figure 2). This feature is very handy if you need to combine data from multiple simulations into a single graph.

Note: This feature only works for the app. For security reason, the embedded applet is not allowed to access the System Clipboard (this is understandable, because people often copy and paste important information!)

Season’s greetings from Energy2D

December 14th, 2013 by Charles Xie
I have been so swamped in fund raising these days that I haven't been able to update this blog for more than two months. Since it is the time of the year again, I thought I should just share a holiday video made by Matthew d'Alessio, a professor at California State University Northridge, using our signature software Energy2D.

The simulator currently attracts more than 5,000 unique visitors each month, a number that probably represents a sizable portion of engineering students studying the subject of heat transfer on the planet. Over the past year, I have received a lot of encouraging emails from Energy2D's worldwide users. Some of them even compared it with well-known engineering programs. Franco Landriscina at the University of Trieste has written Energy2D into his recent Springer book "Simulation and Learning: A Model-Centered Approach."

I am truly grateful for these positive reactions. I want to say "Thank You" for all your nice words. There is nothing more rewarding than hearing from you on this fascinating subject of fluid dynamics and heat transfer. Rest assured that the development of this program will resume irrespective of its funding. In 2014, I hope to come up with a better radiation solver, which I have been thinking for quite a long time. It turns out that simulating radiation is much more difficult than simulating convection!

Here is a tutorial video in Spanish made by Gabriel Concha.

Engineers use Energy2D to simulate rocket mass heaters

April 24th, 2013 by Charles Xie
Link to simulation
A rocket mass heater is an innovative and highly efficient space heating system, which is popular among natural building DIYers since its invention in 1970s. A number of engineers who are interested in rocket stove design have used our Energy2D software to visualize the thermal physics involved.
Link to simulation

Martin Karl Waldenburg from Germany has designed a series of simplified rocket stove simulations. With his permission, we have published his simulations on our Energy2D website. This blog post provides links to three of his simulations. Another one was created by Pinhead of the Rocket Stove Forum (who also gave us permission to publish his simulation).

Link to simulation
Link to simulation
Since Energy2D hasn't supported chemical reactions yet, in all these simulations, burning is simulated using a heater with a fan to approximate the driving pressure due to combustion.

We will continue to work on Energy2D's computational engine and improve its graphical user interface. Currently, we are plowing through the math needed to model thermal radiation, chemical reactions, and phase changes. Once these features are added, we hope more people will find it useful, educational, and entertaining.

Using Energy2D to simulate Trombe walls

February 26th, 2013 by Charles Xie

A Trombe wall is a sun-facing wall separated from the outdoors by glass and an air space. It consists a solar absorber (such as a dark surface) and two vents for air in the house to circulate through the space and carry the solar heat to warm the house up. In a way, a Trombe wall is like a machine that uses air as a convey belt of thermal energy harvested from the sun. Trombe walls are very simple and easy to make and are sometimes used in passive solar green buildings.


Hiding sophisticated power of computational fluid dynamics behind a simple graphical user interface, our Energy2D software can easily simulate how a Trombe wall works. The two images in this blog post show screenshots of a Trombe wall simulation and its closeup version. You can play the simulation on this page and download the models there. If you open the models using Energy2D, you should be able to see how easy it is to tweak the models and create realistic heat flow simulations.

Solar chimneys operate based on similar principles. Energy2D should be able to simulate solar chimneys as well. Perhaps this would be a good challenge to you. (I will post a solar chimney simulation later if I figure out how to do it.)

Energy2D to reach thousands of schools

August 17th, 2012 by Charles Xie
Thermoregulation
Project Lead The Way (PLTW) is the leading provider of rigorous and innovative Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education curricular programs used in middle and high schools across the US. The PLTW Pathway To Engineering (PTE) program includes a foundational course called the Principles of Engineering (POE) designed for 10-11th grade students. PLTW curriculum currently reaches 4,780 schools.

According to Bennett Brown, Associate Director of Curriculum and Instruction of PLTW, our Energy2D software will be adopted in the POE curriculum to support a variety of core engineering concepts including power, energy, heat transfer, controls, and environmental factors.
Solar heating cycles

Since the release of the first alpha version in 2011, Energy2D has already been used by thousands of users worldwide, but the collaboration with PLTW will be a big step forward for Energy2D to reach more students. The timing of this collaboration is particularly important to engineering tools such as Energy2D, as--for the first time--engineering has been officially written into the US K-12 Science Education Standards. Once the Standards roll out, thousands of teachers will be looking for leading-edge tools that can help them teach engineering. This will be a great opportunity for Energy2D.

Why is Energy2D so special that people want to use it? Our website provides many self-explanatory examples. But there is one hidden gem I want to emphasize here: Its computational engine is based on good algorithms I devised specially for this simulator. Its heat solver can be so accurate that a simulation can maintain the total energy of an isolated system at a level as accurate as 99.99% for as long as it runs, regardless of the complexity of the structures in the system! The fact that the sum of energy from all the 10,000 grid cells remains a constant after billions of individual calculation steps reflects the holy grail of science and engineering. If anything, engineering is about accuracy. A good engineering tool should be able to give students a good engineering habit of mind and accuracy should be a paramount part of it.

The first Earth science simulation in Energy2D is here: Mantle convection!

August 8th, 2012 by Charles Xie
It is my goal to make the Energy2D software a powerful simulation tool for a wide audience. Last week I have added some engineering examples and blogged about them.

Last night I came up with an idea for simulating mantle convection, the slow creeping motion of Earth's rocky mantle caused by convection currents carrying heat from the interior of the Earth to the surface. It turned out that the idea worked out.
 
This blog post demonstrates the first geoscience simulation created using Energy2D. The two screenshots show mantle convection at different times. The streamlines in the second image represent the convective currents. From the simulation, you can see the gradual cooling of the core due to mantle convection--This happens in the time frame of billions of years, but a computer simulation can show it in a few seconds. For simplicity, we don't distinguish the inner core and the outer core in this model. Later, we can build a more complex one that includes these subtle details.

The simulation is available online at: http://energy.concord.org/energy2d/mantle.html. Take a look and stay tuned for more Earth science simulations--brought to you by Energy2D!

Energy2D V1.0 released!

August 3rd, 2012 by Charles Xie
The first stable version of Energy2D, an open-source and free heat transfer simulation tool made possible by funding from the National Science Foundation, is now available for download. The program can be installed as a desktop app, which can be used to create high-quality simulations that can be deployed on the Internet as applets. It comes with about 40 templates to help you get started to design your own simulations. The Energy2D website provides plenty of examples that show how you can integrate your simulations on your websites. The examples cover a wide range of topics in heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and thermal engineering. Thermal engineering is a major feature added recently and will be expanded in the future. The example to the right, "How solar cycles affect the duty cycle of a thermostat," showcases this new feature.

When you click the "Java Webstart Installer" on the website, the software will be automatically downloaded and installed on your desktop. The website's Download page has detailed information for how to publish your Energy2D simulations or integrate them with your web stuff.

If you have used the Energy2D app before, you will need to remove the previous installation in order to enjoy the convenience of full OS integration that this version offers. For Windows users, go to "Control Panel > Java." For Mac users, go to the Java Preference. In either case, you can find the previous installation in "Temporary Internet Files."

If you have just used the online applets on our website but haven't downloaded the app, there is nothing you need to remove. Although it is perfectly fine to use the online applets as they are, we think you should try the app--It will give you the full ability to create, design, and test.

Thermostats in Energy2D

July 27th, 2012 by Charles Xie
A thermostat is a controller that maintains a system's temperature near a fixed point. The simplest thermostat does this by switching a heater or AC on and off to maintain the desired temperature (known as the bang-bang control). I spent a couple of days adding thermostats to Energy2D and developing a simple GUI for setting up thermostats.

In Energy2D, a thermostat is a connection between a power source and a thermometer. A thermometer can be linked to any number of power sources, but a power resource can only be linked to one thermometer. In the property window of a thermometer, the user can select the power sources it will control.

This Energy2D model demonstrates how a thermostat works. Turn on the temperature graph. Let the simulation run for a few cycles and then turn on the sunlight. Compare the behavior of the temperature graph. You can also try to move the temperature sensor around to examine how the on/off time of the thermostat depends on its location.

You should discover from this simulation that, when the sun shines on the house, it ends up using less energy to maintain the inside temperature because the time that the heater is on is shorter (see the differences of the two graphs in the first two images of this post). You should also find out why we should not put the sensor of a thermostat near a window.

The third image shows multiple thermostats at work to create different heating zones. This Energy2D simulation has four heaters in three rooms, each of which is controlled by a thermostat. 

From these demos of thermostats in Energy2D, you can see the richness of the software. I will add more useful features like this to make Energy2D even better. Stay tuned!

Two Interactive Features Added to Energy2D

July 23rd, 2012 by Charles Xie
Energy2D is our signature software for heat transfer and fluid dynamics simulations. Written in Java, it runs speedily either as a standalone app on your desktop or an embedded applet within a browser. It is actively being developed to meet the need of energy education to have an interactive and constructive learning environment based on rigorous scientific principles. Energy2D is already a highly interactive system--you can change anything that is allowed to change by the author of a simulation while it is running. Recently, I have added two new features to make it even more interactive. Both features apply to all existing Energy2D simulations I (or you) have created.

The first one is a "heat dropper," a mode in which the user can click or drag the mouse to add or remove heat from the location in the model that the mouse points to. If you have a touch screen, you can touch or swipe your finger across it and the heat dropper works as if your finger could give heat to the virtual space in the simulation. The first video in this blog post shows how it works.

The second one is a "field reader," a mode in which the user can move the mouse to read the value of a property distribution field at the location the mouse points to. Currently, the supported property fields include temperature, thermal energy, and fluid velocity (which will be zero in a solid). The second video shows how it works.

If a web page that embeds an Energy2D applet doesn't already have a drop-down menu on the page for you to switch to these modes, you can always access them through the View Options dialog window. The View Options menu can be found if you right-click on a spot in the simulation window that is not occupied by a model component (like a polygon or a sensor).

A simple IR experiment to prove that the North Carolina Sea Level Rise Bill is just flat wrong

July 5th, 2012 by Charles Xie
Last month, North Carolina's Senate passed a bill that would have required the state's Coastal Resources Commission to base predictions of future sea level rise along the state's coast on a steady, linear rate of increase. This has sparked controversies across the nation amid the record heat waves in many states.

If the lawmakers had done our very simple IR experiment on visualizing thermohaline in a cup, published in the July issue of last year's Journal of Chemical Education (see the image to the left), they would have had a better understanding about the possibility of the nonlinear acceleration of ice shelf melting: The less salty the seawater is, the faster the ice shelf above it melts. And the faster ice melts, the less salty the seawater will become. This creates a positive feedback loop that accelerates the melting process. If the speed of ice melting in systems as simple as a cup of saltwater is not as nice as the "steady, linear" rate some of the lawmakers would like to see, who can be sure that systems as complex as the Earth would follow a "steady, linear" trajectory of change?

If you bother to read on, this experiment uses just a cup of tap water, a cup of salt water, and some ice cubes. The two cups are placed next to each other on a table for comparison. (a) An IR image right after an ice cube was added to a cup of freshwater (left) and a cup of saltwater (right). (b) An IR image taken after four minutes showing a downwelling column in the freshwater. (c) An IR image taken after nine minutes showing the tabletop was cooled significantly near the freshwater cup. (d) An IR image taken after 16 minutes showing that the bottom of the freshwater cup became cooler than the top whereas the bottom of the saltwater cup remained warmer than the top.

To see the entire process caught under an IR camera, you can watch the embedded YouTube videos in this blog post. Feel free to send these videos to your representatives if you happen to live in the coastal area of North Carolina. Or send to a science teacher in North Carolina in the hope that the bill will be revised in the future to consider the possibility of nonlinear acceleration.

Note that these videos do not represent any political view and should not be considered as in support of any agenda, my purpose is only to provide a humble scientific demonstration to prove that things do not always go smoothly as we wish.