Tag Archives: NSF

Building data science fluency using games

The National Science Foundation has awarded the Concord Consortium a three-year Cyberlearning grant to develop and test new data science games for high school biology, chemistry, and physics, and research how learners conceive of and learn with data. The Data Science Games project builds on prior work, which led to the invention of a new genre of learning technology—a “data science game.”

The use of games for education is a growing field with significant promise for STEM learning. Games provide a powerful means of motivation and engagement, and align with many STEM learning goals. Data Science Games is making use of the data generated as students play digital games in a novel and creative way. When students play a data science game, their gameplay actions generate data—data that is essential to the game itself. To succeed at a data science game, students must visualize, understand, and properly apply the data their game playing has generated in order to “level up” and progress within the game. As they visualize and analyze the data, planning and plotting new, evolving strategies, students learn the fundamentals of data science.

The new data science games will be embedded in our open source Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP). Data from the games will flow seamlessly into CODAP thanks to innovations that leverage advances in the interoperability of components embedded in browsers, new capabilities for data visualization using HTML5, and recent innovations in design of interfaces compatible with both PC-based browsers and touch devices.

Project research will investigate ways this new genre of educational technology can be integrated into classroom learning. We will identify and characterize learner perceptions of data, including how learners see flat, hierarchical, and network structures as emerging from realistic problems; questions learners ask with data; and learning trajectories for restructuring and visualization of data.

The project will also produce guidelines for making use of data science games across a range of grade levels and subject matter. Data Science Games will thus provide both models and templates of how to integrate learning of data science into existing content areas, helping to grow the next generation of data scientists.

Data Science Games Play Roshambo against the evil Dr. Markov (log in as guest). If you win, you can save Madeline the dog. Improve your odds by analyzing Markov’s moves in a graph.

Play Roshambo
(log in as guest)

Digital gaming will connect afterschool students with biotech mentors

Our nation’s future competitiveness and our citizens’ overall STEM literacy rely on our efforts to forge connections between the future workforce and the world of emerging STEM careers. Biotechnology, and genetics in particular, are rapidly advancing areas that will offer new jobs across the spectrum from technicians to scientists. A new $1.2 million National Science Foundation-funded project at the Concord Consortium will use Geniverse, an immersive digital game where students put genetics knowledge into action as they breed dragons, to help connect underserved students with local biotechnology professionals to strengthen student awareness of STEM careers.

East End House Students

Students from East End House enjoy collaborating on computer-based science activities.

Geniverse is our free, web-based software designed for high school biology that engages students in exploring heredity and genetics by breeding and studying virtual dragons. This game-like software allows students to undertake genetics experimentation with results that closely mimic real-world genetics. The new GeniConnect project will extend the gaming aspects of Geniverse and revise the content to more fully target middle school biology, introducing Geniverse to the afterschool environment.

The three-year GeniConnect project will develop and research a coherent series of student experiences in biotechnology and genetics involving game-based learning, industry mentoring, and hands-on laboratory work. Industry professionals from Biogen, Monsanto, and other firms will mentor afterschool students at East End House, a community center in East Cambridge, Massachusetts.

With researchers from Purdue University, we’ll explore how an immersive game and a connection to a real scientist can increase STEM knowledge, motivation, and career awareness of underserved youth. We will also develop and research a scalable model for STEM industry/afterschool partnerships, and produce a STEM Partnership Toolkit for the development of robust, educationally sound partnerships among industry professionals and afterschool programs. The Toolkit will be distributed to approximately 500 community-based organizations and afterschool programs nationally that are member organizations of the Alliance for Strong Families and Communities.

Geniverse Narrative

Beautiful graphics designed by FableVision Studios engage students in a compelling narrative. Students follow the arduous journey of their heroic character and suffering dragon to the Drake Breeder’s Guild.

Geniverse Lab

Students are welcomed into the Drake Breeder’s Guild where they will learn the tricks of the genetic trade. (Drakes are a model species that can help solve genetic mysteries in dragons, in much the same way as the mouse is a model species for human genetic disease.) Students are engaging in an authentic, experiment-driven approach to biology—in a fantastical world.

Launching a new interdisciplinary field of study in spoken language technology for education

A grant from the National Science Foundation will help launch a new interdisciplinary field of study in spoken language technology for education. The one-year “Building Partnerships for Education and Speech Research” project will unite the extensive education research and educational technology backgrounds at the Concord Consortium and SRI International’s Center for Technology in Learning (CTL) and bring them together with two of the strongest groups in spoken language technology research, the Speech Technology and Research (STAR) Laboratory at SRI and the Center for Robust Speech Systems (CRSS) at the University of Texas at Dallas.

The sophistication of technologies for processing and understanding spoken language—such as speech recognition, detection of individual speakers, and natural language processing—have radically improved in recent years, though most people’s image of modern spoken language technology is colored by often-finicky interactions with Siri or Google products. In fact, many lesser-known technologies can now automatically detect many features of speech, including question asking, dialog interchanges, word counts, indication of emotion or stress, and specific spoken keywords with high accuracy.

However, educational research has barely begun exploring their potential to provide insight into, and eventually revolutionize, research areas as diverse as collaboration, argumentation, discourse analysis, emotion, and engagement. And capturing the most critical and substantive interactions during the teaching and learning process—the discourse and conversation among students, teachers, and mentors—remains elusive.

The central goal of this new project is to generate interest in and momentum toward the use of spoken language technologies in education research. The potential for such applied technologies is vast, and the broader impacts could be significant. As these technologies become established for use in improved education research and development, researchers will be able to better understand and target interventions, educators will be able to monitor and adjust their interactions with learners, and learners will be better informed of their learning progress.

The National Science Foundation funds grant to pair intelligent tutoring system and Geniverse

Games, modeling, and simulation technologies hold great potential for helping students learn science concepts and engage with the practices of science, and these environments often capture meaningful data about student interactions. At the same time, intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) have undergone important advancements in providing support for individual student learning. Their complex statistical user models can identify student difficulties effectively and apply real-time probabilistic approaches to select options for assistance.

The Concord Consortium is proud to announce a four-year $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation that will pair Geniverse with robust intelligent tutoring systems to provide real-time classroom support. The new GeniGUIDE—Guiding Understanding via Information from Digital Environments—project will combine a deeply digital environment with an ITS core.

Geniverse is our free, web-based software for high school biology that engages students in exploring heredity and genetics by breeding and studying virtual dragons. Interactive models, powered by real genes, enable students to do simulated experiments that generate realistic and meaningful genetic data, all within an engaging, game-like context.

Geniverse Breeding

Students are introduced to drake traits and inheritance patterns, do experiments, look at data, draw tentative conclusions, and then test these conclusions with more experimentation. (Drakes are a model species that can help solve genetic mysteries in dragons, in much the same way as the mouse is a model species for human genetic disease.)

The GeniGUIDE project will improve student learning of genetics content by using student data from Geniverse. The software will continually monitor individual student actions, taking advantage of ITS capabilities to sense and guide students automatically through problems that have common, easily rectified issues. At the classroom level, it will make use of this same capability to help learners by connecting them to each other. When it identifies a student in need of assistance that transcends basic feedback, the system will connect the student with other peers in the classroom who have recently completed similar challenges, thus cultivating a supportive environment.

At the highest level, the software will leverage the rich data being collected about student actions and the system’s evolving models of student learning to form a valuable real-time resource for teachers. GeniGUIDE will identify students most in need of help at any given time and provide alerts to the teacher. The alerts will include contextual guidance about students’ past difficulties and most recent attempts as well as suggestions for pedagogical strategies most likely to aid individual students as they move forward.

The Concord Consortium and North Carolina State University will research this layered learner guidance system that aids students and informs interactions between student peers and between students and teachers. The project’s theoretical and practical advances promise to offer a deeper understanding of how diagnostic formative data can be used in technology-rich K-12 classrooms. As adaptive student learning environments find broad application in education, GeniGUIDE technologies will serve as an important foundation for the next generation of teacher support systems.

The National Science Foundation awards grant to study virtual worlds that afford knowledge integration

The Concord Consortium is proud to announce a new project funded by the National Science Foundation, “Towards virtual worlds that afford knowledge integration across project challenges and disciplines.” Principal Investigator Janet Kolodner and Co-PI Amy Pallant will explore how the design of project challenges and the contexts in which they are carried out can support knowledge integration, sustained engagement, and excitement. The goal is to learn how to foster knowledge integration across disciplines when learners encounter and revisit phenomena and processes across several challenges.

Aerial Geography and Air QualityIn this model, students explore the effect of wind direction and geography on air quality as they place up to four smokestacks in the model.

We envision an educational system where learners regularly engage in project-based education within and across disciplines, and in and out of school. We believe that, with such an educational approach, making connections across learning experiences should be possible in new and unexplored ways. If challenges are framed appropriately and their associated figured worlds (real and virtual) and scaffolding are designed to afford it, such education can help learners integrate the content and practices they are learning across projects and across disciplines. “Towards virtual worlds” will help move us towards this vision.

This one-year exploratory project focuses on the possibilities for knowledge integration when middle schoolers who have achieved water ecosystems challenges later attempt an air quality challenge. Some students will engage with EcoMUVE, where learners try to understand why the fish in a pond are dying, and others will engage with Living Together from Project-Based Inquiry Science (PBIS), where learners advise about regulations that should be put in place before a new industry is allowed to move into a town. A subset of these students will then encounter specially crafted air quality challenges based on High-Adventure Science activities and models. These, we hope, will evoke reminders of experiences during their water ecosystem work. We will examine what learners are reminded of, the richness of their memories, and the appeal for learners of applying what they are learning about air quality to better address the earlier water ecology challenge. Research will be carried out in Boston area schools.

Sideview Pollution Control Devices In this model, students explore the effects of installing pollution control devices, such as scrubbers and catalytic converters, on power plants and cars. Students monitor the level of primary pollutants (brown line) and secondary pollutants (orange line) in the model over time, via the graph.

The project will investigate:

  1. What conditions give rise to intense and sustained emotional engagement?
  2. What is remembered by learners when they have (enthusiastically) engaged with a challenge in a virtual figured world and reflected on it in ways appropriate to learning, and what seems to affect what is remembered?
  3. How does a challenge and/or virtual world need to be configured so that learners notice—while not being overwhelmed by—phenomena not central to the challenge but still important to making connections with content outside the challenge content?

Our exploration will help us understand more about the actual elements in the experiences of learners that lead to different emotional responses and the impacts of such responses on their memory making and desires.

Lessons we learn about conditions under which learners form rich memories and want to go back and improve their earlier solutions to challenges will form some of the foundations informing how to design virtual worlds and project challenges with affordances for supporting knowledge integration across projects and disciplines. Exemplar virtual worlds and associated project challenges will inform design principles for the design and use of a new virtual world genre — one with characteristics that anticipate cross-project and cross-discipline knowledge integration and ready learners for future connection making and knowledge deepening.

9 Highlights of 2012

It was a great year for the Concord Consortium!

  1. We won a Smaller Business Association of New England (SBANE) Innovation Award!
  2. Next-Generation Molecular Workbench interactives starred in the MIT MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) “Introduction to Solid State Chemistry” through a new collaboration with edX.
  3. Chad Dorsey described our vision of deeply digital education at the national Cyberlearning Research Summit.
  4. Six new projects were funded by the National Science Foundation: InquirySpace, Understanding Sub-Microscopic Interactions, High-Adventure Science: Earth’s Systems and Sustainability, GeniVille, Graph Literacy, and Sensing Science.
  5. The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), a federally funded organization that scans educational research for high-quality studies, recognized our Technology Enhanced Elementary and Middle School Science (TEEMSS) software and materials.
  6. The Concord Consortium Collection was accessioned into the National Science Digital Library (NSDL).
  7. Our debut webcast featured Chad Dorsey, speaking about the scientific and engineering practices of the Next Generation Science Standards and our free, technology-based activities.
  8. We had two fabulous Google Summer of Code students.
  9. Our staff population increased by 10%, thanks to our new Software Portfolio and Project Manager Jen Goree, Web Developer Parker Morse, and Software Developer Tom Dyer, who just started (technically in 2013, but we’re so excited, we’ve included him on this 2012 list)!

2013 promises to be another great year! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and subscribe to our mailing list to receive print or email news updates.