Tag Archives: publications

Concord Consortium Publishes Important Research in Educational Technology

Nine publications illuminate our research in educational technology in 2017. Learn about engineering design tools that may help bridge the design-science gap (#5), a systems modeling tool that supports students in the NGSS practice of developing and using models and the crosscutting concept of systems (#1), an Earth science curriculum that increases student scientific argumentation abilities (#6), the relative ease of creating hierarchical data structures (#9), automated analysis of collaborative problem solving in electronics (#8), and more.

1. New systems modeling tool supports students

The NGSS identify systems and system models as one of the crosscutting concepts, and developing and using models as one of the science and engineering practices. However, students do not naturally engage in systems thinking or in building models to make sense of phenomena. The Concord Consortium and Michigan State University developed a free, web-based, open-source systems modeling tool called SageModeler and a curricular approach designed to support students and teachers in engaging in systems modeling.

Damelin, D., Krajcik, J., McIntyre, C., & Bielik, T. (2017). Students making system models: An accessible approach. Science Scope, 40(5), 78-82.

2. Students should face the unknown and engage in frontier science questions

Students should see science as an ongoing process rather than as a collection of facts. Six High-Adventure Science curriculum modules provide an opportunity to bring contemporary science and the process of doing science into the classroom. Interactive, dynamic models help students make sense of complex Earth systems. Embedded assessments prompt students to interpret data to make scientific arguments and evaluate claims while considering the uncertainty inherent in frontier science.

Pallant, A. (2017). High-Adventure Science: Exploring evidence, models, and uncertainty related to questions facing scientists today. The Earth Scientist, 33, 23-28.

3. Automated feedback helps students write scientific arguments

Automated scoring and feedback support students’ construction of written scientific arguments while learning about factors that affect climate change. Results showed that 77% of students made revisions to their open-ended argumentation responses after receiving feedback. Students who revised had significantly higher final scores than those who did not, and each revision was associated with an increase on the final scores.

Zhu, M., Lee, H.-S., Wang, T., Liu, O. L., Belur, V., & Pallant, A. (2017). Investigating the impact of automated feedback on students’ scientific argumentation. International Journal of Science Education, 1–21.

4. Review of research on women’s underrepresentation in computing fields

This literature review synthesizes research on women’s underrepresentation in computing fields across four life stages: 1) pre-high school; 2) high school; 3) college major choice and persistence; and 4) postbaccalaureate employment. Access to and use of computing resources at the pre-high school and high school levels are associated with gender differences in interest and attitudes toward computing. In college, environmental context contributes to whether students will major in computing, while a sense of belonging and self-efficacy as well as departmental culture play a role in persistence in computing fields. Work-life conflict, occupational culture, and mentoring/networking opportunities play a role in women’s participation in the computing workforce.

Main, J. B., & Schimpf, C. (2017). The underrepresentation of women in computing fields: A synthesis of literature using a life course perspective. IEEE Transactions on Education, 60(4), 296-304.

5. Students improve knowledge by designing with robust engineering tools

Eighty-three 9th grade students completed an energy-efficient home design challenge using our Energy3D software. Students substantially improved their knowledge. Their learning gains were positively associated with three types of design actions—representation, analysis, and reflection—measured by the cumulative counts of computer logs. These findings suggest that tools are not passive components in a learning environment, but shape design processes and learning paths, and offer possibilities to help bridge the design-science gap.

Chao, J., Xie, C., Nourian, S., Chen, G., Bailey, S., Goldstein, M. H., Purzer, S., Adams, R. S., & Tutwiler, M. S. (2017). Bridging the design-science gap with tools: Science learning and design behaviors in a simulated environment for engineering design. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 54(8), 1049-1096.

6. Students improve their scientific argumentation skills

Making energy choices means considering multiple factors, exploring competing ideas, and reaching conclusions based on the best available evidence. Our High-Adventure Science project created a free online energy module in which students compare the effects of energy sources on land use, air quality, and water quality using interactive models, real-world data on energy production and consumption, and scaffolded argumentation tasks. We analyzed pre- and post-test responses to argumentation items for 1,573 students from three middle schools and seven high schools. Students significantly improved their scientific argumentation abilities after using the energy module.

Pallant, A., Pryputniewicz, S. & Lee, H-S. (2017). The future of energy. The Science Teacher, 84(3), 61-68.

7. Students learn about sustainability

Educators must figure out how to prepare students to think about complex systems and sustainability. We elucidate a set of design principles used to create online curriculum modules related to Earth’s systems and sustainability and give examples from the High-Adventure Science module “Can we feed the growing population?” The module includes interactive, computer-based, dynamic Earth systems models that enable students to track changes over time. Embedded prompts help students focus on stocks and flows within the system, and identify important resources in the models, explain the processes that change the availability of the stock, and explore real-world examples.

Pallant, A., & Lee, H. S. (2017). Teaching sustainability through systems dynamics: Exploring stocks and flows embedded in dynamic computer models of an agricultural system. Journal of Geoscience Education, 65(2), 146-157.

8. Automated analysis sheds light on collaborative problem solving

The Teaching Teamwork project created an online simulated electronic circuit, running on multiple computers, to assess students’ abilities to work together as a team. Modifications to the circuit made by any team member, insofar as they alter the behavior of the circuit, can affect measurements made by the others. We log all relevant student actions, including calculations, measurements, online student communications, and alterations made by the students to the circuit itself. Automated analysis of the resulting data sheds light on the problem-solving strategy of each team.

Horwitz, P., von Davier, A., Chamberlain, J., Koon, A., Andrews, J., & McIntyre, C. (2017). Teaching Teamwork: Electronics instruction in a collaborative environment. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 41(6), 341-343.

9. Students understand how to structure data

In this study participants were presented with diagrams of traffic on two roads with information about eight attributes (e.g., type of vehicle, its speed and direction) and asked to record and organize the data to assist city planners in its analysis. Overall, 79% of their data sheets successfully encoded the data. Even 62% of the middle school students created a structure that could hold the critical information from the diagrams. Students were more likely to create nested data structures than they were to produce one flat table, suggesting that hierarchical structures might be more intuitive and easier to interpret than flat tables.

Konold, C., Finzer, W., & Kreetong, K. (2017). Modeling as a core component of structuring data. Statistics Education Research Journal, 16(2), 191-212.

The Concord Consortium’s Top 10 News Stories from 2017

The year 2017 was a significant one for the Concord Consortium. Even though we lost our founder—and an amazing friend, colleague, mentor, and collaborator—our memories of Robert Tinker and his work resonate in an enduring way. Not many people can say they’ve worked with a legend. But anyone who knew our beloved founder recognized they were in the presence of a brilliant mind and a person with genuine compassion. While Bob’s passing on June 21, 2017, is a source of sadness for us all, we honor his legacy every day through our work. Share your memory of how Bob inspired you (and read stories of the many people Bob inspired).

Here, we share our year’s top 10 news stories.

1. Data Science Education Leaps into the Future

We jump-started the new field of data science education to bring about effective learning with and about data. In February 2017 we convened the Data Science Education Technology conference in Berkeley, California—right next to our West Coast office—with over 100 thought leaders from organizations around the U.S. and six continents. We’ve also hosted over a dozen meetups and webinars since that seminal event. We’re planning our schedule for 2018 and invite you to help us bring about the data science education revolution.

2. We Publish Influential Research and Analysis

We published authoritative articles in the Earth Scientist, the International Journal of Science EducationIEEE Transactions on Education, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, the Science Teacher, the Journal of Geoscience Education, the Community College Journal of Research and Practice, the Statistics Education Research Journal, and Science Scope. We’re looking forward to 2018, too, with several papers scheduled to be published in the New Year.

3. We Embraced Our Creative Side and Reached Out to You

We embraced our creative side, and collaborated with Blenderbox to create a website that invites users to explore our work and use our free digital resources. Two jam-packed newsletters offered visionary commentary as well as practical instruction. We expanded our blog, and reached out to many more of you through Twitter and Facebook. Keep your shares and comments coming.

Energy3D can be used to design four types of concentrated solar power plants: solar power towers, linear Fresnel reflectors, parabolic troughs, and parabolic dishes.

4. General Motors Awards $200,000 Grant

General Motors is committed to powering its worldwide factories and offices with 100% renewable energy by 2050. The company furthered its commitment by awarding the Concord Consortium a $200,000 grant to promote engineering education using renewable energy as a learning context and artificial intelligence as a teaching assistant. The project will use our signature Energy3D software, an easy-to-use CAD tool for designing and simulating solar power systems.

5. What a Busy Year Presenting on the Road

We presented our free resources and research at over 25 sessions at NSTA, NARST, AERA, ISTE, BLC, American Society for Engineering Education, NSTA STEM Forum & Expo, MAST, EdSurge, International Dialogue on STEM 2017, and ISDDE2017, plus the Global Education & Skills Forum in Dubai and the International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interactions in Japan. Phew! At AERA 2018 we’ll host a special session to honor the work and legacy of Bob Tinker called “Deeply Digital Learning: The Influence of Robert Tinker on STEM Education and the Learning Sciences.”

Students can explore and evaluate the condition of their local watershed using the free, web-based Model My Watershed application.

6. We Won!

Congratulations to the WikiWatershed online toolkit, which includes the Model My Watershed app developed in collaboration with the Stroud Water Research Center. It was awarded the 2017 Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. And our Water SCIENCE project won a facilitators’ choice award in the National Science Foundation’s STEM for All Video Showcase.

7. We Partnered with Publishers to Bring STEM Inquiry Activities to More Students

  • We continued our partnership with McGraw-Hill Education to create engaging simulations for their Inspire Science elementary science curriculum. These simulations allow students to explore questions in ways that scientists and engineers do, and cover a variety of topic areas in K-5 science.
  • We incorporated our Next-Generation Molecular Workbench into PASCO’s Essential Chemistry textbook as fully interactive simulations that challenge students to explore topics in chemistry such as chemical reactions and particle motion.

If you’re interested in creating a groundbreaking STEM curriculum or pursuing an innovative new idea together, we’re excited to explore the possibilities with you.


8. Twenty-four Hours of Pandemonium and Prototypes

Our East and West Coast offices got together in July for a “FedEx day,” so called because the goal is to develop a blizzard of new prototypes and innovations in 24 hours and deliver them overnight! We developed prototypes for blocks-based programming in augmented reality (imagine Scratch/StarLogo, but with printable blocks that connect like puzzle pieces); a collaborative ecology game based on a tangible user interface; an internal project dashboard (think Intranet on steroids); an agent-based convection model; a way to connect real-time sensor data from our offices directly into our data exploration tool CODAP; and an open-source editor for activity transcripts. Plus President Chad Dorsey got out his power tools and built a picnic table that turns into a bench — almost Transformer-worthy.



9. Six New Employees Sign On

We welcomed six fabulous new employees in our Concord, MA, and Emeryville, CA, offices: Tom Farmer, Lisa Hardy, Eli Kosminsky, Andrea Krehbiel, Joyce Massicotte, and Judi Raiff. Want to join our growing family? We’re hiring!

10. Thirty-One Projects Research and Develop Educational Technology and Curriculum

Through 31 research projects with countless amazing collaborators, we’re extending our pioneering work in the field of probeware and other tools for inquiry and continuing to develop award-winning STEM models and simulations. We’re taking the lead in new areas, including data science education, analytics and feedback, and engineering and science connections. And we’re exploring and creating cutting-edge new tools and technologies for tomorrow’s learners in our innovation lab.