Category Archives: Main Blog

Data Science Education Meetup at Cyberlearning 2017

Thank you to the fantastic crowd at Cyberlearning 2017 who attended our Data Science Education Meetup at Mussel Bar and Grill on Tuesday night. The Meetup provided an opportunity for members of the Cyberlearning community to discuss innovative ways that we could implement data science education into research and curriculum development, to address NSF’s 10 Big Ideas for Future Investments strand in data science [PDF], and to enjoy some great food!

Our attendees at the Data Science Education Meetup at Cyberlearning 2017

Attendees at the Data Science Education Meetup at Cyberlearning 2017

There were several strands of activity toward data science education at Cyberlearning 2017, and the Meetup provided an opportunity for us to share and reflect on the following:

  • A roundtable session on Teaching Data Science, in which our own William Finzer facilitated a discussion on our Data Science Education Technology conference in Berkeley in February.
  • Hearing about some of the challenges researchers face in implementing curriculum at the middle school and high school level, as well as some of the Cyberlearning projects (such as Data Science Games, CODAP, Impact Studio, Learning and Youth, and STEM Literacy Through Infographics), which are hoping to address these challenges.
  • Participating in the Data Science Education for 21st Century Learning CL17 Working Sessions Strand. It was especially great to work with Sayamindu Dasgupta and Jesse Bemley to identify the important aspects necessary to move data science education forward.
  • Identifying data science as part of computational thinking, as put forward by NSF Program Officer Arlene M. de Strulle on Wednesday morning.

Our Meetup was packed (we had to move to a larger set of tables, as a matter of fact!), and the evening was full of lively discussion about the impact and need for data science education. We thank everyone who attended and are especially grateful to our community for bringing in so much passion and energy for data science education.

Please check out our future Data Science Education Meetup dates and locations at concord.org/meetup. Or join us online through a series of monthly Data Science Education Webinars, starting in May. We have a great lineup of speakers, including Cliff Konold, Amelia McNamara, and Rob Gould. We’ll post dates and additional information at concord.org/meetup.

As always, please leave a comment or suggestion for future Meetups, community-building activities, or future innovations in data science education you’d like to see. We love hearing from you.

A demo of Infrared Street View

An infrared street view
The award-winning Infrared Street View program is an ambitious project that aims to create something similar to Google's Street View, but in infrared light. The ultimate goal is to develop the world's first thermographic information system (TIS) that allows the positioning of thermal elements and the tracking of thermal processes on a massive scale. The applications include building energy efficiency, real estate inspection, and public security monitoring, to name a few.
An infrared image sphere


The Infrared Street View project is based on infrared cameras that work with now ubiquitous smartphones. It takes advantages of the orientation and location sensors of smartphones to store information necessary to knit an array of infrared thermal images taken at different angles and positions into a 3D image that, when rendered on a dome, creates an illusion of immersive 3D effects for the viewer.

The project was launched in 2016 and later joined by three brilliant computer science undergraduate students, Seth Kahn, Feiyu Lu, and Gabriel Terrell, from Tufts University, who developed a primitive system consisting of 1) an iOS frontend app to collect infrared image spheres, 2) a backend cloud app to process the images, and 3) a Web interface for users to view the stitched infrared images anchored at selected locations on a Google Maps application.

The following YouTube video demonstrates an early concept played out on an iPhone:



Data Science Education Meetup at NSTA 2017

Thanks to all the great folks who attended our NSTA 2017 Data Science Education Meetup at BottleRock LA last night. We had a great crowd attend, complete with representatives from Magnitude.io, the education arm of the International Space Station (ISS), CASIS, the folks from MiniPCR, LAUSD, Lodi USD, the CREATE for STEM Institute, Educational Passages and more! We’re still processing the yummy food and hours of great conversation about all things data.

Happy attendees at the Data Science Education Meetup at NSTA 2017

A few highlights of the evening included:

  • Hearing about streaming atmospheric data from Magnitude.io’s successful rocket and balloon launches at Lodi schools and others all across California, and their ExoLab experiments on the ISS
  • Debating the grand challenges and barriers to data science education with teachers and district staff
  • Hearing about how using data, modeling and evidence has transformed teaching for those using the Interactions curriculum from the CREATE for STEM Institute and the Concord Consortium
  • Seeing Liam Kennedy’s amazing ISS-ABOVE device that changes your TV into a portal to the International Space Station, complete with live alerts when the ISS passes overhead
  • Learning about how MiniPCR’s Genes in Space competition is bringing high school students’ experiments to the space station and how a new USB-stick-sized gene sequencing device is speeding up microbe research on the ISS by orders of magnitude
  • Hearing stories of how data from GPS-tracked drifter boats from Educational Passages has connected students across continents
The place was packed and the evening was full of great geekery, all the more evidence that the time has come for data science education. We thank everyone who attended and we look forward to building networks, collaborations and new modes of teaching and learning together.
Missed us last night? No problem. Join us for the next one, at an upcoming conference near you! See all our meetups and RSVP at concord.org/meetup.

Global Researchers and Developers Connect at 2017 Data Science Education Technology Conference

Over 100 thought leaders from organizations around the U.S. and four continents gathered from February 15 to 17 to generate important innovations needed in technology and teaching and learning at the Concord Consortium’s first Data Science Education Technology conference. Senior researchers, educators, and scientists from as far as Nigeria and New Zealand convened at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, California, to share a comprehensive overview of this rapidly growing area of data science education.

“This is a thrilling milestone,” notes Chad Dorsey, president and CEO of the Concord Consortium. “Never before have experts across mathematics, science, and technology come together to focus their thinking on the emerging field of data science education.”  

Dan Damelin, William Finzer, and Natalya St. Clair of the Concord Consortium.

Some of the 100 DSET Conference attendees.

Over the next few decades, data science education is expected to undergo a profound change. According to opening panelist Deb Nolan, UC Berkeley is offering an Intro to Data Science Class with enrollment of over 700 students in it, and there is currently a campus-wide initiative to plan for a data science major. In addition, the National Science Foundation has included Harnessing Data for 21st Century Science and Engineering as a priority in a “10 Big Ideas for Future Investments” report.

To reflect the dual-sided nature of this new territory in education, the conference topics comprised two strands. The Teaching and Learning strand, designed for those considering data science-related curriculum development, brought together researchers and educators, and generated a wealth of new understandings and patterns for educational research—educators in particular left with fresh ideas on how to apply cutting-edge curriculum practices in their classroom. Researchers left with important ideas about how to define success for educational results in this fast-growing and essential research field.

“Data science is evolving. And data science education is a science on its own, which can reach out to all branches of science and similar social sciences. Already I see people here who are trying to brainstorm ways we can move ahead on data science and how we can move forward to educate people on data science,” says Kenechukwu Okeke of Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nigeria.

In the Technology strand, participants worked with data analysis platforms such as Tuva, Desmos, and CODAP (the Common Online Data Analysis Platform). Participants with software experience created their own CODAP plug-ins and also built skills to make their work more efficient. In the closing session, DSET participants watched as Ph.D. student Takahiko Tsuchiya (Georgia Institute of Technology) made data in CODAP audible as sound using a sonification plug-in he had programmed during the conference.

Register now for CADRE Webinar on DSET conference highlights

Join William Finzer, Daniel Damelin, and Natalya St. Clair of the Concord Consortium in a CADRE webinar Friday, March 3, from 1-2 pm EST for highlights from the DSET conference. Register now!

Join us at future DSET Meetups

We’ll continue to gather thought leaders in data science education technology through informal meetups in Austin, San Antonio, Los Angeles, Portland, Baltimore, and New Zealand. Going to SXSW Edu, NCTM, or NSTA? Contact us for more information about upcoming meetups. We look forward to seeing you!

 

Designing building-integrated photovoltaics with Energy3D

Fig. 1: An example of solar facade.
Building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) represents an innovative way to think and design buildings as both human dwellings and power plants. In BIPV, solar panels or photovoltaic thin films are used to replace conventional constructional materials in parts of the building envelope such as roofs, walls, and even windows. Designing new buildings nowadays increasingly includes BIPV elements to offset operational costs. Existing buildings can also be retrofitted with BIPV (e.g., replacing glass curtain walls with solar panels). BIPV is expected to grow more important in architectural design and building engineering.

Fig. 2: An example of solar curtain walls
We are developing modeling capabilities in Energy3D to support the design, simulation, and analysis of BIPV. Figures 1 and 2 in this article show a few cases that demonstrate these capabilities in their primitive forms. Considering BIPV is relatively new and a lot of research is still under way to develop and test new ideas and technologies, we expect the development of these capabilities in Energy3D will be a long-term effort that will be integrated with latest research and development in the industry.
Fig.3: Power balancing throughout the day.

As the first step towards that long-term vision, the current version of Energy3D has already allowed you to add solar panel racks to any planar surface, being it horizontal, vertical, or slanted. Running a simulation for any day, you will be able to predict the daily output of all the solar panels. You can also compare the outputs of selected arrays. For example, if you want to track down on which side solar panels produce the most at a given time during the day, you can compare them in a graph. Figure 3 shows a comparison of the solar arrays in the model shown in Figure 1. As you can see, the east-facing array produces peak energy in the morning whereas the west-facing array produces peak energy in the afternoon. In this case, the BIPV solution ensures that the photovoltaic system generates some electricity at different times of the day.

Video tutorial: Solarize an imported building in Energy3D

We are pleased to announce that the solar panel and analysis tools in Energy3D (version 6.5.6 or higher) are now fully applicable to arbitrary imported structures. We hope that the new capabilities can help engineers who design rooftop solar systems and building solar facades to get their jobs done more efficiently and students who are interested in engineering to learn the theory and practice in an inquiry-based fashion. The six-minute video in this article demonstrates how easy it is to perform solar panel design and analysis in Energy3D. (Note: Unfortunately, the annotations in the video do not show if you are watching this on a smartphone.)



One of the handiest features is the automatic, real-time detection of the angle of the surface under a solar panel while the user is moving it. This feature basically allows the user to drag and drop a solar panel or a solar panel rack anywhere (on top of roofs, walls, or other surfaces) without having to set its tilt angle manually.

Solar heat map of a house with solar panels
Copy and paste a house with solar panels
Solar panels are "first-class citizens" in Energy3D as they are readily recognized by the built-in simulation engines. Energy3D provides a comprehensive list of properties that you can choose for each solar panel or solar panel array. For example, even the temperature coefficient of Pmax, a parameter that specifies the change of solar cell efficiency with regard to ambient temperature change, is supported. The software also has a variety of analytic tools for predicting the hourly, daily, and annual outputs of each solar panel and their sums. Interactive graphs are available to intuitively show the trends and allow the user to compare the outputs of different solar panels, of different arrays, on different days, or with different environmental settings (e.g., with or without a tree nearby).

These "native" solar panels are now completely blended into the "alien" meshes of structures imported into Energy3D from other CAD software or Google Earth. For example, once you drop a solar panel on a surface of the structure, it will stick to it. In other words, if you move or rotate the structure, the solar panel will go with it as if it were part of the original design. When you copy and paste the entire building, the solar panels will be copied and pasted as well (by the way, it takes only four clicks to copy and paste a building in Energy3D through the pop-up menu: one click to pick which one to act upon, one click to select the "Copy" action, one click to pick where to paste, and one last click to select the "Paste" action). That is to say, the native and alien meshes are completely meshed.

Data Science Education Technology Conference ready to welcome 100 thought leaders

We are proud to announce the Data Science Education Technology (DSET) Conference to be held February 15-17, 2017, at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, CA. Over 100 thought leaders from a range of organizations, including UC Berkeley, TERC, EDC, Desmos, SRI, Exploratorium, New York Hall of Science, Harvard’s Institute for Applied Computational Science, Lawrence Hall of Science, and Tuva will be in attendance at this groundbreaking event in the emerging field of data science education.

Conference attendees come from 15 states and 6 countries around the world. Map created with CODAP. View the data table and more information about attendees in this CODAP document.

“Data and analytics hold promise for revolutionizing all aspects of learning,” Chad Dorsey, president and CEO of the Concord Consortium, explains. “As we enter a world where practically every decision and moment of the day will connect to data in some way, preparing learners to explore, understand, and communicate with data must become a key national priority.”

The DSET conference addresses these new opportunities by focusing on two strands. The Teaching and Learning strand is designed for those thinking about curriculum development. This strand addresses the pedagogical challenges and opportunities associated with making use of data technologies in educational settings. Sessions will include data-driven learning experiences and discussion of lessons learned by curriculum designers. “It’s an exciting time to design activities to help students be ready for data science in the future,” notes Tim Erickson of Epistemological Engineering.

The Technology strand is designed especially for those with programming experience and focuses on software development. Attendees will build relevant, timely skills and learn to create a web app and increase efficiency. William Finzer, developer of the Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) at the Concord Consortium, will lead a session on data technology integration with online curricula and moderate a discussion on leveraging open-source software to enhance learners’ experience working with data.

You’re invited to attend the conference as a virtual participant. Registration is free! Join the virtual conference!

Register for the Virtual Conference

Where else can I connect with #dsetonline?

Virtual attendees are encouraged to join the conference backchannel social media conversation that will run concurrently with the face-to-face conference.

Evo-Ed Integrative Cases will be enriched to address NGSS

A new collaborative research project at the Concord Consortium and Michigan State University will develop and research learning materials on the molecular and cellular basis for genetics and the process of evolution by natural selection. These two areas are both difficult to teach and learn, and although they have been historically taught separately, they are interlinked and span multiple levels of organization. The goal of Connected Biology: Three-dimensional learning from molecules to populations is to design, develop, and examine the learning outcomes of a new connected curriculum unit for biology that embodies the conceptual framework of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Peter White, science education researcher and entomologist at Michigan State University (MSU); Louise Mead, Education Director at the BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action at MSU; and postdoctoral fellow Alexa Warwick at the BEACON Center visited the Concord Consortium recently to plan our joint work together. Frieda Reichsman and Paul Horwitz will serve as the Principal Investigator and Co-PI at the Concord Consortium.

The new units will leverage the contextually rich Evo-Ed Integrative Cases, which build directly on the interlinked nature of evolution and genetics and connect the science ideas with meaningful real-world examples. The Evo-Ed case studies track the evolution of traits from their origination in DNA mutation, to the production of different proteins, to the fixation of alternate macroscopic phenotypes in reproductively isolated populations. For example, the Evolution of Lactase Persistence case study examines the genetics, cell biology, anthropology, and biogeography of this system.

The human lactase gene (LCT) is a 55 kilo-base pair segment of the second chromosome.

The curriculum will integrate the three dimensions of science—the core ideas of biology, the science and engineering practices, and the crosscutting concepts—to support all students in building toward deep understandings of biological phenomena. The project will be guided by two main research questions:

  1. How does learning progress when students experience a set of coherent biology learning materials that employ the principles of three-dimensional learning?
  2. How do students’ abilities to transfer understanding about the relationships between molecules, cells, organisms, and evolution change over time and from one biological phenomenon to another?

Note: If you’ve used the Evo-Ed cases in your classroom, we’d love to get your feedback! Please respond to this short survey to be entered into a drawing to receive a $50 Amazon gift card.

Teaching about water quality and the importance of fresh water

A new resolution may overturn the Interior Department’s “Stream Protection Rule,” which required coal mining companies to monitor and test the quality of local streams and rivers before, during, or after mining operations. There is no better time than the present to learn about the importance of water issues in our communities and environment. Three Concord Consortium projects focus on teaching middle and high school students about their local watersheds, careers in environmental conservation, and freshwater availability, and all of them offer free, high-quality resources ideal for classrooms or informal education settings.

The Teaching Environmental Sustainability: Model My Watershed project, a collaborative research project at the Concord Consortium, Millersville University, and the Stroud Water Research Center, has developed curricula for environmental/geoscience disciplines for high school classrooms, using the Model My Watershed (MMW) web-based application. The curricula also integrate low-cost environmental sensors, allowing students to collect and upload their own data and compare them to data visualized on the new MMW.

In Supporting Collaborative Inquiry, Engineering, and Career Exploration with Water (Water SCIENCE), middle school students from southern Arizona, central valley California, southeastern Pennsylvania, and eastern Massachusetts complete hands-on science and engineering activities, receive guidance and instruction from undergraduate and graduate student mentors, interact online with STEM professionals, and learn about careers in environmental conservation and engineering while investigating their community’s local water resources.

Melinda Daniels, Associate Research Scientist at the Stroud Water Research Center, describes her work. Watch additional videos about water scientists and environmental conservationists »

And in our High-Adventure Science project, we’ve developed a unit entitled “Will there be enough fresh water?” Students explore the distribution and uses of fresh water on Earth. They run experiments with computational models to explore the flow of groundwater, investigate the relationship of groundwater levels to rainfall and human impact, and hear from a hydrologist working on the same question. Students think about how to assess the sustainability of water usage locally and globally while considering their own water usage. Use these great resources today to help students understand critical water issues!

Aquifers

Students use computational models to explore water extraction from aquifers in urban and rural areas.

Importing and analyzing models created by other CAD software in Energy3D: Part 2


Fig.1: The Gherkin (London, UK)
In Part I, I showed that Energy3D can import COLLADA models and perform some analyses. This part shows that Energy3D (Version 6.3.5 or higher) can conduct full-scale solar radiation analysis for imported models. This capability officially makes Energy3D a useful daylight and solar simulation tool for sustainable building design and analysis. Its ability to empower anyone to analyze virtually any 3D structure with an intuitive, easy-to-use interface and speedy simulation engines opens many opportunities to engage high school and college students (or even middle school students) in learning science and engineering through solving authentic, interesting real-world problems.
Fig. 2: Beverly Hills Tower (Qatar)

There is an ocean of 3D models of buildings, bridges, and other structures on the Internet (notably from SketchUp's 3D Warehouse, which provides thousands of free 3D models that can be exported to the COLLADA format). These models can be imported into Energy3D for analyses, which greatly enhances Energy3D's applicability in engineering education and practice.

Fig. 3: Solar analysis of various houses
The images in this post show examples of different types of buildings, including 30 St Mary Axe (the Gherkin) in London, UK (Figure 1) and the Beverly Hills Tower in Qatar (Figure 2). Figure 3 shows the analyses of a number of single-family houses. All the solar potential heat maps were calculated and generated based on the total solar radiation that each unit area on the building surfaces receive during the selected day (June 22).

These examples should give you some ideas about what the current version of Energy3D is already capable of doing in terms of solar energy analysis to support, for example, the design of rooftop solar systems and building solar facades.

In the months to come, I will continue to enhance this analytic capacity to provide even more powerful simulation and visualization tools. Optimization, which will automatically identify the boundary meshes (meshes that are on the building envelope), is currently on the way to increase the simulation speed dramatically.