Energy2D video tutorials in English and Spanish

Many users asked if there is any good tutorial of Energy2D. I apologize for the lack of a User Manual and other tutorial materials (I am just too busy to set aside time for writing up some good documentations).


So Carmen Trudell, an architect who currently teaches at the School of Architecture of the University of Virginia, decided to make a video tutorial of Energy2D for her students. It turned out to be an excellent overview of what the software is capable of doing in terms of illustrating some basic concepts related to heat transfer in architectural engineering. She also kindly granted permission for us to publish her video on Energy2D's website so that other users can benefit from her work.

If you happen to come from the Spanish-speaking part of the world, there is also a Spanish video tutorial made by Gabriel Concha based on an earlier version of Energy2D.

Beautiful Chemisty won the Vizzies Award

The National Science Foundation and the Popular Science Magazine have announced that “Beautiful Chemistry” won the Expert's Choice Award for Video at the 2015 Visualization Challenge, known as Vizzies. According to the Popular Science Magazine,
For many, the phrase “chemical reactions” conjures memories of tedious laboratory work and equations scribbled on exams. But Yan Liang, a professor at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, sees art in the basic science. Last September, Liang and colleagues launched beautiful​chemistry.net to highlight aesthetically pleasing chemistry. Their video showcases crystallization, fluorescence, and other reactions or structures shot in glorious detail. Liang says finding experiments that meet their visual standards has been a challenge. “Many reactions are very interesting, but not beautiful,” he says. “But sometimes, when shot at close distance without the distraction of beakers or test tubes, ordinary reactions such as precipitation can be very beautiful.”
Beautiful Chemistry is the first of the Beautiful Science Series that Prof. Liang has been planning. The series will include two new titles, Beautiful Simulations and Beautiful Infrared, which we will co-produce with Prof. Liang this summer while he visits Boston.

Congratulations to Prof. Liang for this amazing work!

Comparing two smartphone-based infrared cameras

Figure 1
With the releases of two competitively priced IR cameras for smartphones, the year 2014 has become a milestone for IR imaging. Early in 2014, FLIR unveiled the $349 FLIR ONE, the first IR camera that can be attached to an iPhone. Months later, a startup company Seek Thermal released a $199 IR camera that has an even higher resolution and is attachable to most smartphones. In addition, another company Therm-App released an Android mobile thermal camera that specializes in long-range night vision and high-resolution thermography, priced at $1,600. The race is on... Into 2015, FLIR announced a new version of FLIR ONE that supports both Android and iOS and will probably be even more aggressively priced.

Figure 2
All these game changers can take impressive IR images just like taking conventional photos and record IR videos just like recording conventional videos, and then share them online through an app. The companies also provide a software developers kit (SDK) for a third party to create apps linked to their cameras. Excited by these new developments, researchers at several Swedish universities and I have embarked an international collaboration towards the vision that IR cameras will one day become as necessary as microscopes in science labs.

Figure3
To test these new IR cameras, I did an easy-to-do experiment (Figure 1) that shows a paradoxical warming effect on a piece of paper placed on top of a cup of (slightly cooler than) room-temperature water. This seemingly simple experiment actually leads to very deep science at the molecular level, as blogged before.

I took images using FLIR ONE (Figure 2) and SEEK (Figure 3), respectively. These images are shown to the right for comparison. As you can see, both cameras are sensitive enough to capture the small temperature rise caused by water absorption and condensation underside the paper.

The FLIR ONE has a nice feature that contextualizes the false-color IR image by overlaying it on top of the edges (where brightness changes sharply) of the true-color image taken at the same time by the conventional camera of the smartphone. With this feature, you can see the sharp edges of the paper in Figure 2.

Energy2D recommended in computational fluid dynamics textbook

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an important research method that uses numerical algorithms to solve and analyze problems that involve fluid flows. Computers are used to perform the calculations required to simulate the interaction of liquids and gases with surfaces defined by boundary conditions. Today, almost every branch of engineering rely on CFD simulations for conceptual design and product design.

A recent textbook "Computational Fluid Dynamics, Second Edition: A Practical Approach" by Profs. Jiyuan Tu, Guan Heng Yeoh, and Chaoqun Liu has recommended Energy2D as "Shareware CFD" for beginners. Here is a quote from their excellent book:
"Nevertheless, first-time CFD users may wish to search the Internet to gain immediate access to an interactive CFD code. (Users may be required to register in order to freely access the interactive CFD code.) The website is http://energy.concord.org/energy2d/index.html provides simple CFD flow problems for first time users to solve and allows colorful graphic representation of the computed results."

Happy New Year from Energy2D

In the year 2014, Energy2Dhas incorporated a radiation simulation engine and a particle simulation engine, expanding its modeling capacity and making it a truly multiphysics simulation package. To celebrate the New Year, I made some simulations that demonstrate these multiphysics features using objects shaped after the numbers of 2015.

These simulations feature the fluid dynamics engine, the heat conduction engine, the thermal radiation engine, and the particle dynamics engine. If you are curious enough, you can click this link to run the simulations.


These shapes were drawn using Energy2D's polygon and ring tools, which allow users to create a wide variety of arbitrary 2D shapes. Many users probably do not know how versatile the polygon tool actually is (the original triangle icon on the tool bar probably misleads some to think it is only good for drawing triangles -- so I changed it to look like a cross-section of an I-beam). The polygon tool allows one to easily draw a polygon with maximally 256 control points for adjusting its shape later. One can draw an approximate shape and then drag these control points to get it to the exact shape. To modify a shape even further, one can also insert a control point by double-clicking on an existing point. A new point will be added to the adjacent position, which you can then drag around. To delete a control point, just hold down the SHIFT key while double-clicking on it. In addition, a polygon can be rotated, twisted, compressed, or elongated using the corresponding fields in its property window (there is currently no graphical user interface for doing those things, however).

As for the New Year's resolutions, in 2015, the ring shape will be enhanced into a new tool called the shape subtractor, which allows users to subtract a shape from another to make a hollow one.

On the numerical simulation side, we will continue to improve the accuracy of the existing simulation engines by adding an explicit solver as an option for users to overcome some of the problems related to the implicit solvers.

On the multiphysics modeling side, we will try to support multiple fluids, which seems simple at first glance but has turned out to be a very difficult mathematical problem. With the capacity of multiple fluids, we will also be able to add an electromagnetism solver in order to model effects such as electrorheological fluids (fluids whose viscosity changes with respect to an applied electric field).

We wish all Energy2D users a very successful new year!

The deception of unconditionally stable solvers

Unconditionally stable solvers for time-dependent ordinary or partial differential equations are desirable in game development because they are highly resilient to player actions -- they never "blow up." In the entertainment industry, unconditionally stable solvers for creating visual fluid effects (e.g., flow, smoke, or fire) in games and movies were popularized by Jos Stam's 1999 paper "Stable Fluids."

Figure 1: Heat conduction between two objects.
The reason that a solver explodes is because the error generated in a numerical procedure gets amplified in iteration and grows exponentially. This occurs especially when the differential equation is stiff. A stiff equation often contains one or more terms that change very rapidly in space or time. For example, a sudden change of temperature between two touching objects (Figure 1) creates what is known as a singularity in mathematics (a jump discontinuity, to be more specific). Even if the system described by the equation has many other terms that do not behave like this, one such term is enough to crash the whole solver if it is linked to other terms directly or indirectly. To avoid this breakdown, a very small time step must be used, which often makes the simulation look too slow to be useful for games.

The above problem typically occurs in what is known as the explicit method in the family of the finite-difference methods (FDMs) commonly used to solve time-dependent differential equations. There is a magic bullet for solving this problem. This method is known as the implicit method. The secret is that it introduces numerical diffusion, an unphysical mechanism that causes the errors to dissipate before they grow uncontrollably. Many unconditionally stable solvers use the implicit method, allowing the user to use a much larger time step to speed up the simulation.

There ain't no such thing as a free lunch, however. It turns out that we cannot have the advantages of both speed and accuracy at the same time (efficiency and quality are often at odd in reality, as we have all learned from life experiences). Worse, we may even be deceived by the stability of an unconditionally stable solver without questioning the validity of the predicted results. If the error does not drive the solver nuts and the visual looks fine, the result must be good, right?

Figure 2: Predicted final temperature vs. time step.
Not really.

The default FDM solver in Energy2D for simulating thermal conduction uses the implicit method as well. As a result, it never blows up no matter how large the time step is. While this provides good user experiences, you must be cautious if you are using it in serious engineering work that requires not only numerical stability but also numerical reliability (in games we normally do not care about accuracy as long as the visual looks entertaining, but engineering is a precision science). In the following, I will explain the problems using very simple simulations:

1. Inaccurate prediction of steady states

Figure 3. Much longer equilibration with a large time step.
Figure 1 shows a simulation in which two objects at different temperatures come into contact and thermal energy flows from the high-temperature object into the low-temperature one. The two objects have different heat capacities (another jump discontinuity other than the difference in initial temperatures). As expected, the simulation shows that the two objects approach the same temperature, as illustrated by the convergence of the two temperature curves in the graph. If you increase the time step, this overall equilibration behavior does not change. Everything seems good at this point. But if you look at the final temperature after the system reaches the steady state, you will find that there are some deviations from the exact result, as illustrated in Figure 2, when the time step is larger than 0.1 second. The deviation stabilizes at about 24°C -- 4°C higher than the exact result.
Figure 4. Accurate behavior at a small time step.

2. Inaccurate equilibration time

The inaccuracy at large time steps is not limited to steady states. Figure 3 shows that the time it takes the system to reach the steady state is more than 10 times (about 1.5 hours as opposed to roughly 0.1 hours -- if you read the labels of the horizontal time axis of the graph) if we use a time step of 5 seconds as opposed to 0.05 second. The deceiving part of this is that the simulation appears to run equally quickly in both cases, which may fool your eyes until you look at the numerical outputs in the graphs.

3. Incorrect transient behaviors

Figure 5. Incorrect behavior at a very large time step.
With a more complex system, the transient behaviors can be affected more significantly when a large time step is used. Figure 4 shows a case in which the thermal conduction through two materials of different thermal conductivities (wood vs. metal) are compared, with a small time step (1 second). Figure 5 shows that when a time step of 1,000 seconds is used, the wood turns out to be initially more conductive than metal, which, of course, is not correct. If the previous example with two touching objects suggests that the simulation result can be quantitatively inaccurate at large time steps, this example means that the results can also be qualitatively incorrect in some cases (which is worse).

The general advice is to always choose a few smaller time steps to check if your results would change significantly. You can use a large time step to set up and test your model rapidly. But you should run your model at smaller time steps to validate your results.

The purpose of this article is to inform you that there are certain issues with Energy2D simulations that you must be aware if you are using it for engineering purposes. If these issues are taken care of, Energy2D can be highly accurate for conduction simulations, as illustrated by this example that demonstrates the conservation of energy of an isolated conductive system.

Energy2D and Quantum Workbench featured in Springer books


Two recently published Springer books have featured our visual simulation software, indicating perhaps that their broader impacts beyond their originally intended audiences (earlier I have blogged about the publication of the first scientific paper that used Energy2D to simulate geological problems).

A German book "Faszinierende Physik" (Fantastic Physics) includes a series of screenshots from a 2D quantum tunneling simulation from our Quantum Workbench software that shows how wave functions split when they smash into a barrier. The lead author of the book said in the email to us that he found the images generated by the Quantum Workbench "particularly beautiful."

Another book "Simulation and Learning: A Model-Centered Approach" chose our Energy2D software as a showcase that demonstrates how powerful scientific simulations can convey complex science and engineering ideas.

Quantum Workbench and Energy2D are based on solving extremely complex partial differential equations that govern the quantum world and the macroscopic world, respectively. Despite the complexity in the math and computation, both software present intuitive visualizations and support real-time interactions so that anyone can mess around with them and discover rich scientific phenomena on the computer.

European scientists use Energy2D to simulate submarine eruptions

The November issue of the Remote Sensing of Environment published a research article "Magma emission rates from shallow submarine eruptions using airborne thermal imaging" by a team of Spanish scientists in collaboration with Italian and American scientists. The researchers used airborne infrared cameras to monitor the 2011–2012 submarine volcanic eruption at El Hierro, Canary Islands and used our Energy2D software to calculate the heat flux distribution from the sea floor to the sea surface. The two figures in the blog post are from their paper.

According to their paper, "volcanoes are widely spread out over the seabed of our planet, being concentrated mainly along mid-ocean ridges. Due to the depths where this volcanic activity occurs, monitoring submarine volcanic eruptions is a very difficult task." The use of thermal imaging in this research, unfortunately, can only detect temperature distribution on the sea surface. Energy2D simulations turn out to be a complementary tool for understanding the vertical body flow.

Their research was supported by the European Union and assisted by the Spanish Air Force.

Although Energy2D started out as an educational program, we are very pleased to witness that its power has grown to the point that even scientists find it useful in conducting serious scientific research. We are totally thrilled by the publication of the first scientific paper that documents the validity of Energy2D as a research tool and appreciate the efforts of the European scientists in adopting this piece of software in their work.

Common architectural styles supported by Energy3D


Energy3D supports the design of some basic architectural styles commonly seen in New England, such as Colonial and Cape Cod. Its simple 3D user interface allows users to quickly sketch up a house with an aesthetically pleasing look -- with only mouse clicks and drags (and, of course, some patience). This makes it easy for middle and high school students to create meaningful, realistic designs and learn science and engineering from these authentic experiences -- who wants to keep doing those cardboard houses that look nothing like a real house for another 100 years?

The true enabler of science learning in Energy3D is its analytic capability that can tell students the energy consequences of their designs while they are working on them. Without this analytical capability, learning would have been cut short at architectural design (which undeniably is the fun part of Energy3D that entices students to explore many different design options that entertain the eyes). With the analytical capability, the relationship between form and function becomes a major driving force for student design. It is at this point that an Energy3D project becomes an engineering design project.

Architectural design, which focuses on designing the form, and engineering design, which focuses on designing the function, are equally important in both educational and professional practices. Students need to learn both. After all, the purpose of design is to meet various people's needs, including their aesthetic needs. This principle of coupling architectural design and engineering design is of generic importance as it can be extended to the broader case of integrating industrial design and engineering design. It is this coupling that marries art, science, and usability.

We are working on providing a list of common architectural styles that can be designed using Energy3D. These styles, four of them are shown in this article, show only the basic form of each style. Each should only take less than an hour to sketch up for beginners. If you want, you can derive more complex and detailed designs for each style.